Intel SSD 660p 1TB SSD Reviews and more
Posted on: 08/08/2018 12:46 PM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

AMD EPYC 7351P 16-Core 32-Thread Processor (SP3) Review
Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L and Q300P Review
Corsair STRAFE MK.2 RGB Mechanical Keyboard Review
Corsair Strafe RGB MK.2 Review
Dead Cells Review
Deepcool Gamer Storm MF120 RGB Review
Divoom Timebox Smart Music Clock Review
Falcon Project X VR Ready Gaming PC Review
Fnatic Streak / miniStreak Review
Intel SSD 660p 1TB Review
Intel SSD 660p 1TB SSD Review
Intel SSD 660p 1TB SSD Review
Intel SSD 660p Review
Intel SSD 660p SSD Review
Intel SSD 660p SSD Review
MSI GV62 8RE Review
MSI Radeon RX 580 Mech 2 8 GB Review
Phanteks Eclipse P350X Case Review
Roccat Tyon Multi-Button White Gaming Mouse Review
Stanley FatMax Lithium-Ion LED/HID Flashlight Review
Thermaltake Smart RGB 700w Power Supply Review
weBoost 4G-X OTR Review
What's new in macOS Mojave beta 6
ZOOZ ZSE18 Z-Wave Plus Motion Sensor with Magnetic Base Review

AMD EPYC 7351P 16-Core 32-Thread Processor (SP3) Review
The EPYC specifications aren’t a secret, so let us start with those. As mentioned above, you get 16 CPU cores and 32 Threads in the AMD EPYC 7351P. The base clock is set at 2.4 GHz with a core boost of up to 2.9GHz, for all cores.

The P at the end of the product name identifies that it is a processor for a socket count of 1. As with all EPYC processors, you get 128 PCIe lanes. What’s more to mention? Well, you get 64MB L3 cache within the 170W TDP package.

The processor is a SoC design, eliminating the need for a southbridge or other type of chipset. That reduces the distance information has to travel which is a great thing on any day. You also get support for 8 (eight) channel memory with a speed of 2666MHz and a bandwidth of 341 GB/s; up to 2TB.


Read full article @ eTeknix

Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L and Q300P Review
Today, we are testing the Q300L and Q300P, a new Micro ATX duo from Cooler Master, positioned in the budgetary space. We tested the two cases with an ASRock AB350M Pro4 motherboard and the Cooler Master MasterAir G100M UFO cooler to find out what you can expect from the two cases. We’ll see if they can break away from the crowd even in the lower price segment with some tricks.


Read full article @ OCInside.de

Corsair STRAFE MK.2 RGB Mechanical Keyboard Review
What is the main reason to spend money on a “gaming” mechanical keyboard vs a regular keyboard? With membrane based gaming keyboards, your purchase depends mainly on features that you can only utilize during gameplay. But with a gaming mechanical keyboard, your priorities in performance to value are more broad. You’re looking for a long life keyswitch that offers tactile feel and a comfortable typing experience as well. This is what we should all look for in a gaming mechanical keyboard, does the K70 MK.2 live up to these expectations? We’ll find out in this article for Benchmark Reviews.


Read full article @ Benchmark Reviews

Corsair Strafe RGB MK.2 Review
Next-generation Strafe gets more features and a higher price. Enthusiast gamers may set their sights on Corsair's flagship mechanical keyboard, the venerable K95 RGB Platinum, but the premium price tag can serve as a sizeable obstacle. Appreciating that most users' budgets don't stretch quite that far, Corsair has been busy refreshing its second-tier offerings with MK.2 versions of the popular K70 RGB and Strafe RGB.

The latter will be of particular interest to those seeking an affordable path into Corsair's mechanical keyboard ecosystem, so let's see what's what by taking a closer look at the 2018 Strafe RGB MK.2 in Cherry MX Silent flavour.


Read full article @ Hexus

Dead Cells Review
Dead Cells is a Castlevania-inspired side-scrolling action game from the French developer Motion Twin. In addition to having unusually progressive payroll policies, the indie studio is evidently very good at making video games. Yes, Dead Cells is a winner, particularly if you're into the idea of slowly rolling a boulder up a hill while periodically noticing that the boulder just got a little bit lighter.


Read full article @ TechSpot

Deepcool Gamer Storm MF120 RGB Review
Deepcool have developed an RGB fan that's like nothing we've seen before. They've entirely foregone the frame and typical PWM connection, instead using a central hub as the frame for the entire fan and communicating to your smartphone via a supplied WiFi hub.


Read full article @ Vortez

Divoom Timebox Smart Music Clock Review
The Timebox Smart Alarm Clock by Divoom may not be the perfect alarm clock but thanks to its 121 programmable RGB LEDs, 5W full-range driver with DSP and several built-in features it doesn't leave much to be desired.

Just like wrist watches are gradually being replaced by smart watches (although i have a feeling that there will always be a market for mechanical watches) alarm clocks have also evolved and so today consumers can find models featuring a plethora of available functions. My first ever encounter with such an alarm clock was back in 2010 when i reviewed the aXbo SleepPhase Alarm Clock but even though i really liked the concept (also ended up using it myself for the next 4 years or so) technology has made large steps in the 8 years since. On top of that add the appearance of numerous new manufacturers since then and it's only natural that new and more exciting models have emerged. Divoom is best known for their wireless speakers but their Timebox line of Smart Music Clocks is also very popular and so the wooden version ended up in our lab just over a month ago.

Divoom is one of the most reputable speaker brands in the world, and the Divoom speakers have been sold world-wide over 40 different countries. Throughout its 10 years journey, Divoom strives for the audio perfection by providing the most innovating and refined audio products. The fine-tuned audio quality is infused within every Divoom speaker, and it’s also the Divoom’s promise to every music enthusiast in the world. We say,9% love,17% beauty,13% fashion,5% madness,17% power, 8% goal in the last minute,6% adrenaline,25% heart and soul service, that is your 100% Divoom. The Divoom brand was inspired our love of music and the passion for fine audio. To strike for acoustic perfection, we religiously fine-tuned our speaker to suit every music enthusiasts. Our goal is to develop the innovative audio products that excel in aesthetic design and audio performance for all music lovers.


Read full article @ NikKTech

Falcon Project X VR Ready Gaming PC Review
Got £1150 to spend on a new gaming rig? We look at the Falcon Project X VR Ready Gaming PC. The Falcon Project X VR Ready Gaming PC is a mid-range PC that attempts to provide ample gaming power inside a chassis that’s impressively compact – and for a price that undercuts most of its competition. We give you the full low-down on this system to let you know if it is worth buying.

This £1,150 rig serves up processing grunt from a second-generation AMD Ryzen chip, and it’s paired with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 graphics card plus solid memory and storage options. And, impressively, Falcon allows for loads of customisation on its website – so it’s easy to change the parts if they don’t take your fancy.


Read full article @ KitGuru

Fnatic Streak / miniStreak Review
We take a look at a pair of new mechanical gaming keyboards with RGB, the Fnatic Streak and miniStreak. Do they cut it in an already competitive market? Let's find out!

The name Fnatic is synonymous with eSports and the London, UK based professional gaming organization is one of the most popular in all the world. With teams in a variety of eSports games such as Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Dota2 and more recently, Overwatch, the sky’s the limit for the top eSports team in Europe. Winning in gaming isn’t just what Fnatic are all about, but their entry into gaming hardware is something they have taken seriously with the introduction of their full-sized Streak and tenkeyless miniStreak RGB mechanical gaming keyboards aimed at providing users with the tools needed to win. While this is subjective and using new hardware can’t promise skill increases, having the right tools with good quality components can certainly make a world of difference in the competitive gaming segment.


Read full article @ Play3r

Intel SSD 660p 1TB Review
Intel's SSD 660p marks the debut of QLC flash for the consumer market. The new flash brings SATA-like pricing to the NVMe segment.

Intel’s new SSD 600p NVMe SSD marks the arrival of the first consumer drive with QLC flash. The new flash technology brings along the promise of lower prices and more capacious storage devices in the future, but it already looks good today. The SSD 660p communicates over a fast PCIe 3.0 x4 link to deliver solid performance numbers of up to 1.8 GB/s of throughput and offers surprisingly good performance in random workloads. If that wasn’t enough, the 660P comes with a five-year warranty and an MSRP below $0.20-per-GB, which is cheaper than many budget SATA SSDs with three-year warranties.

We tested the 1TB model, which has an MSRP of $199, but the 512GB $99 model is all that’s available at launch, and what you’ll find in our buy buttons below.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

Intel SSD 660p 1TB SSD Review
Today we will be looking at the world’s first consumer SSD to feature QLC (Quad Level Cell) NAND Flash. QLC NAND Flash once seemed so far away, but Intel is rolling out the SSD 660p drive series today. The Intel SSD 660p features an SMI controller with Intel firmware optimizations and IMFT 3D 64-layer QLC NAND Flash memory. The Intel SSD 660p series is available in 512GB, 1TB and 2TB capacities and all will be M.2 PCIe NVME drives. Intel is not releasing a SATA III drive with QLC NAND Flash memory at this point in time. We see this as a positive move as we need to speed up the transition from the SATA III interface to PCIe NVMe on mainstream products.

Performance for the 660p drive series is up to 1800 MB/s for sequential read and writes and up 220,000 IOPS for 4K Random read and writes. These aren’t record breaking speeds for a PCIe NVMe drive, but respectable for an entry-level PCIe NVMe product. Intel is also using Dynamic SLC cache to help ensure the best sequential write performance during large file writes. This is the first consumer drive to use fully dynamic SLC cache, so we’ll be talking about that more in-depth and testing it out for ourselves.


Read full article @ Legit Reviews

Intel SSD 660p 1TB SSD Review
Flash Memory Summit 2018 is on, and its rapidly looking like the theme of the year is QLC. QLC stands for Quad Level Cell, which is a bit of a misnomer since there are actually 16 voltage levels of a QLC cell - the quad actually relating to the four bits of data that can be stored at any specific location.

Doubling the number of voltage states allows you to store 33% more data in a given number of flash cells, but comes at a cost. The tighter voltage tolerances required and higher sensitivity to cell leakage mean that endurance ratings cannot be as high as TLC or MLC, and programming (writing) requires greater voltage precision, meaning slower writes. Reads may also see a slight penalty since it is more difficult to discriminate more finely grained voltage thresholds. SSD makers have been trying to overcome these hurdles for years, and it seems that Intel is now the first to crack the code, launching their first mainstream QLC SSD


Read full article @ PC Perspective

Intel SSD 660p Review
Intel has taken another step forward in its perpetual march towards high-capacity, lower-cost solid state drives. Today’s release of the new Intel SSD 660p series of drives marks the first in the company’s line-up to pack its brand-new 64-layer QLC (quad-level cell) 3D NAND flash memory, which essentially doubles the capacities available within the same footprint of previous-gen technologies.

These drives are meant to finally put a nail in SATA’s coffin, thanks to their significantly better performance and aggressive pricing -- at under $0.20 per GiB in some configurations, believe it or not...


Read full article @ HotHardware

Intel SSD 660p SSD Review
When NAND flash memory was first used for general purpose storage in the earliest ancestors of modern SSDs, the memory cells were treated as simply binary, storing a single bit of data per cell by switching cells between one of two voltage states. Since then demand for higher capacity has pushed the industry to store more bits in each flash memory cell.

In the past year, the deployment of 64-layer 3D NAND flash has allowed almost all of the SSD industry to adopt three bit per cell TLC flash, which only a few short years ago was the cutting edge. Now, four bit per cell, also known as Quad-Level Cell (QLC) NAND flash, is the current frontier.


Read full article @ Anandtech

Intel SSD 660p SSD Review
It's another historic day for consumer SSDs. Today Intel begins selling the first consumer NVMe SSD with 4-bit per cell flash technology (QLC). Like 3-bit per cell (TLC) before it, there is a lot of fear surrounding QLC. Will the technology provide enough write endurance, how long will data last on the memory, and the area that terrifies many the most, how much latency will the extra bit add?


Read full article @ TweakTown

MSI GV62 8RE Review
In the spotlight today is a new gaming laptop which sits within MSI's newly created GV Series. GV tackles the lower end of the market and seeks to offer users with entry-level to mid-level options for those on a tighter budget. Today we'll be looking specifically at the GV62 8RE which takes advantage of Intel's 8th Generation Coffee Lake Core i5-8300H CPU.


Read full article @ Vortez

MSI Radeon RX 580 Mech 2 8 GB Review
Today we have for review the new MSI Radeon RX 580 Mech 2, which is an overclocked custom design variant of the RX 580. It comes with a dual-slot cooler and delivers excellent noise levels that match the quietest RX 580 cards. Overclocking is great too, we reached 1540 MHz.

Just a few weeks ago, MSI announced its Mech 2 lineup of custom-design AMD Radeon graphics cards lead by the Radeon RX 580 Mech 2 8 GB, which we have for review today. MSI won't officially comment on why the Mech 2 series exists when the company already has Gaming Series Radeon RX 500 series products, such as the RX 580 Gaming X, but media reports suggest that the series was raised to keep MSI in compliance with the now-dead GeForce Partner Program (GPP). ASUS made similar changes to its product stack with the AREZ Strix series. While the AREZ Strix graphics cards are completely identical to the original ASUS ROG Strix Radeon ones, MSI put in more effort to differentiate its products.

You won't be faulted for thinking the Radeon RX 580 Mech 2 is the same exact card as the RX 580 Gaming X at first glance, but look closer and you'll see quite a few differences. To begin with, the underlying TwinFrozr VII heatsink is slightly modified to now come with the heatpipe direct touch GPU base, while the Gaming X has one with a copper base. Also, the metal heatspreader over the memory chips and MOSFETs is gone. There's still a heatsink over the vGPU MOSFETs. The cooler shroud, too, has a different design and is less two-tone and more dark with a smattering of matte red. Lastly, there's a different backplate design that gets rid of the holes for a flat piece of metal with red highlights.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

Phanteks Eclipse P350X Case Review
Back in January of 2018 at CES, we were introduced to an early version of the Eclipse P350X. At the time, Phanteks was positioning this case to reside between the existing P300 and P400, and outfitting it with a ton of great features for a reasonable price. Fast forward a bit, and now we have our hands on a production sample of the P350X, a compact ATX midtower. Phanteks has really put a lot of work into the looks and features of the Eclipse P350X, including a tempered glass side panel and multiple D-RGB LED lighting features. Follow along as we take a closer look at the Phanteks Eclipse P350X!


Read full article @ ThinkComputers.org

Roccat Tyon Multi-Button White Gaming Mouse Review
The Roccat Tyon has long been one of my favourite gaming mice. I’ve actually had one on my desk for quite some time now. However, I have the dull old black and grey one. Now, the Roccat Tyon is back and it’s got its formal suit on thanks to a new white top. But Peter, it’s just a new colour, who cares? Well, a hell of a lot of people do. Aesthetics have become as big a part of the PC gaming market as performance for many. When it comes to creating a unique and stylish gaming system, matching the aesthetics of your hardware is a lot of fun. Of course, that’s not for everyone. However, there’s something nice about sitting at your desk, and everything looking just the way you want it. Of course, if the performance is amazing too, you’re winning both battles in one move.


Read full article @ eTeknix

Stanley FatMax Lithium-Ion LED/HID Flashlight Review
Today I share with you two powerful Stanley flashlights, one LED and one HID, utilizing lithium-ion battery technology as opposed to heavier and problematic sealed lead acid types. Improvements come in the form of weight savings, extended runtime, longer bulb lifetime, and a stronger brighter beam that is literally a light saber! Find out how useful these can be in your home, work, and garage. Everyone needs flashlights, see if these are worth your hard earned money.


Read full article @ ModSynergy.com

Thermaltake Smart RGB 700w Power Supply Review
Over the last 6 months, Thermaltake has been pretty keen on pushing their power supply line. As a reasonably new name to the market, they have already impressed us in the past with their various models of power supplies and coolers. If they are, perhaps, looking to carve a ‘brand image’ for themselves though, it is definitely through the use of software and RGB effects.

While we have already reviewed some of their more ‘prestige’ brands in terms of power supplies (with more to come shortly), we instead this time take a look at one of their more less-expensive designs. Specifically the Thermaltake Smart RGB 700w power supply.

With 700w of power, this should provide more than enough for the vast majority of gaming PC’s and as such, for a low retail price non-modular power supply might seem a tempting choice.


Read full article @ eTeknix

weBoost 4G-X OTR Review
I'm a Linux geek, and I think I safely can assume everyone reading an article in Linux Journal identifies themselves as Linux geeks as well. Through the years I've written about many of my geeky projects here in Linux Journal, such as my Linux-powered beer fermentation fridge or my 3D printer that's remotely controlled using a Raspberry Pi and Octoprint software. The thing is, my interests don't stop strictly at Linux, and I doubt yours do either. While my homebrewing, 3D printing and (more recently) RV interests sometimes involve Linux, often they don't, yet my background means I've taken a geek's perspective and approach to all of those interests. I imagine you take a similar approach to your hobbies and side projects, and readers would find some of those stories interesting, useful and inspirational.


Read full article @ Linux Journal

What's new in macOS Mojave beta 6
Beta 6 of macOS Mojave was released to developers and betas to public testers as well on Monday. It is getting more difficult to discern changes between each build, but there were a couple notable aspects to talk about this time around.


Read full article @ Apple Insider

ZOOZ ZSE18 Z-Wave Plus Motion Sensor with Magnetic Base Review
The ZOOZ ZSE18 Z-Wave Plus motion sensor with magnetic base is an excellent choice for anyone looking to add a motion sensor to their Z-Wave powered home automation system. It is compatible with a handful of hubs, and I found that it works very well with SmartThings. Whether you want to use it as a security device, or merely to make your life more convenient by turning on lights as you pass by in the dark, it will work very well.


Read full article @ Bigbruin.com




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