Gnome 3.28 Review and more
Posted on: 06/17/2018 09:40 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

Alphacool Eisblock GPX-A Review
ASRock Fatal1ty H370 Performance ATX Motherboard Review
Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition 4x8GB DDR4-3466 Review
Cougar Panzer EVO RGB ATX Case Review
Gnome 3.28 Review

Alphacool Eisblock GPX-A Review
AMD's Radeon RX Vega stands to benefit greatly from water-cooling, given its high power consumption. The Alphacool Eisblock GPX-A effectively draws heat away from the card's warmest components, silencing its fan in the process.

AMD's Radeon RX Vega 56 runs cooler than the flagship Vega 64. However, it's still a 210W card that enthusiasts like to overclock. This makes it a perfect target for water-cooling. Plenty of options abound for integrating Radeon RX Vega into a custom loop. Alphacool, Aquacomputer, EK Water Blocks, Watercool, and XSPC all offer Vega-compatible full coverage blocks.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

ASRock Fatal1ty H370 Performance ATX Motherboard Review
ASRock challenges its rivals for the top of the sub-Z-series LGA 1151 market. Can it win the features-v-price war?

Intel has never forgotten that its LGA 1151 platform targets mainstream buyers, even as its 2017 Coffee Lake series CPU launch included only a high-end Z-series chipset. Normally reserved for overclocking enthusiasts, those Z370 boards hardly seemed to be the most value-oriented solution for the clock-locked CPUs that followed the initial K-series chips. April’s H370 and B360 launch finally brought us a full spectrum of sub-$140 boards, including a feature-packed ATX, budget Micro-ATX, and more middling Mini ITX model. With those baselines set, the real competition for value supremacy begins with the Fatal1ty H370 Performance from ASRock.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition 4x8GB DDR4-3466 Review
Corsair sent a 4x8GB kit of its Special Edition LED lighted DDR4-3466. Does it perform as well as it looks?

We’ve been receiving a great number of 32GB DRAM kits since we first started focusing on the Intel memory controller’s preference for at least two ranks per memory channel. As a reminder to casual readers: each side of a memory module has a 64-bit interface, and modules can be arranged as either single rank (aka “single sided”) or dual-rank (aka “dual sided”). Current memory IC density of “eight gigabits” provides that a 64-bit “rank” will have 8GB, and our dual-channel Z370 test platform doesn’t seem to care whether four ranks are spread out across four single-rank DIMMs or combined onto two dual-rank DIMMs.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

Cougar Panzer EVO RGB ATX Case Review
Dubbed the "RGB Crystaline Titan" this chassis not only features dynamic styling and fancy RGB lighting, it has outstanding cooling performance and more than enough space for even the largest of PC builds.

Aggressive styling? Check. Tempered glass panels? Check. Packed with fans sporting RGB functionality? Check. It looks as though Cougar's new Panzer EVO RGB chassis is an upgraded version of the Panzer EVO with RGB options galore. Dubbed the "RGB Crystaline Titan" this chassis not only features dynamic styling and fancy RGB lighting, it has outstanding cooling performance and more than enough space for even the largest of PC builds. At $220, this premium chassis has a price tag to match, but if you can fit the Panzer EVO RGB into your budget, it's worth every penny.


Read full article @ Tom's Hardware

Gnome 3.28 Review
Now that I've tested Fedora 28 Workstation and sampled from its cuisine of good and bad stuff, I'd like to focus on testing Gnome 3.28 proper. I've already hinted at a full, separate review in my Ubuntu Beaver review, being rather sorely disappointed with how Gnome (and as a consequence, Ubuntu) is shaping up. The whole pseudo-touch minimalistic approach feels wrong.

But then, I might be mistaken. The last time I tested Gnome 3 was a whole bunch of years ago, and back then, the overall trend of over-simplification and functionality neutering was strong in this one. Gnome began and continued stripping valuable configurations from its menus, hiding them or removing them altogether, making visual and functional deviations from the intended default state near impossible. Gnome 3.28 brings a whole bunch of changes to the table, so it's time to revisit my impression. After me.


Read full article @ Dedoimedo




Printed from Linux Compatible (https://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/gnome_3_28_review_and_more.html)