AMD Radeon VII 16GB Graphics Card Reviews and more
Posted on: 02/08/2019 11:09 AM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles:

20 of the Worst PC Setups - January 2019
AMD Radeon VII 16 GB Review
AMD Radeon VII 16 GB Review
AMD Radeon VII 16GB Review
AMD Radeon VII Graphics Card Review
AMD Radeon VII Linux Benchmarks - Powerful Open-Source Graphics For Compute & Gaming
AMD Radeon VII Review
AMD Radeon VII Review
AMD Radeon VII Review
AMD Radeon VII Review: 7nm Vega With 16GB HBM2 Benchmarked
Aukey GH-S5 7.1 Virtual Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review
Cooler Master MK730 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review
Cooler Master MK850 Mechanical Keyboard Review
Das Keyboard 5Q Review
Drevo Tyrfing V2 and Durendal 104 Key RGB Mechanical Keyboards Review
HP EX950 2TB SSD Review
MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z 6G Review
Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 5
T-Force Delta TUF Gaming RGB Memory Review
Team Group T-Force Delta TUF Gaming RGB 3200 MHz Review
The AMD Radeon VII Review: An Unexpected Shot At The High-End

20 of the Worst PC Setups - January 2019
I’m sure at some point you’ve had a bad PC setup. Maybe moving into a new place, waiting for a new desk to arrive or you just ran out of room. I can remember my horrible PC setups from when I was living at the dorms in college. If you have ever ventured over to the Shitty Battlestations sub-reddit you will find a lot of horrible PC setups. We will are going to pick 20 each month and feature them as 20 of the Worst PC setups for that month. Here are some of the bad ones from January.


Read full article @ ThinkComputers.org

AMD Radeon VII 16 GB Review
The time has come. We're finally allowed to talk about Radeon VII performance numbers. The company's new flagship graphics card is the world's first to be made using a 7 nanometer production process. Also it has the largest VRAM size of any card below $1000: 16 GB.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

AMD Radeon VII 16 GB Review
We review the new AMD Radeon VII. A product that has been talked about for quite a while. The basis of this high-end graphics card is VEGA64. However with a die-shrink towards a 7nm fabricated package and 16GB of HBM2, the card is released in an aim to compete with the GeForce RTX 2080; will it be capable to do that?


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

AMD Radeon VII 16GB Review
Can AMD challenge in the high end graphics market with its new Radeon VII?


Read full article @ KitGuru

AMD Radeon VII Graphics Card Review
Ever since AMD refreshed most of its Ryzen product range last year using GlobalFoundries' 12LP process—an enhanced version of the foundry's 14 nm FinFET node with higher-performance front-end-of-line transistors but only optional density improvements—and expanded that refresh to Radeons with the RX 590, I sort of expected the company to do the same with its Vega 10 graphics chip at some point. Instead, AMD surprised us at CES by introducing a consumer version of its Vega 20 data-center GPU on board a new graphics card: the Radeon VII. Taking Vega 20 out of the data center means AMD is first to market with a gaming GPU fabricated on TSMC's cutting-edge 7 nm FinFET process.
 
Vega 20 initially made an appearance in the Radeon Instinct MI50 and MI60 accelerators introduced late last year. Instead of making the biggest chip possible as quickly as possible like Nvidia has with its compute accelerator chips of late, Vega 20 only modestly expands the processing capabilities of the Vega 10 GPU to support some reduced-precision data types useful in deep learning applications. TSMC's 7-nm process is a real node shrink with all of the areal scaling such an advance implies, and it does most of the work in delivering a generation-on-generation performance improvement.


Read full article @ The Tech Report

AMD Radeon VII Linux Benchmarks - Powerful Open-Source Graphics For Compute & Gaming
Today we can finally reveal the Linux performance details for the AMD Radeon VII graphics card... Especially if you are an open-source driver fan, it's quite a treat thanks to having fully open-source and fairly mature driver support, but can this $699 USD graphics card dance with the likes of the GeForce RTX 2080? Here is our initial look at the Radeon VII performance on Linux using fifteen different AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards for both OpenCL compute and Vulkan/OpenGL gaming on Ubuntu Linux.


Read full article @ Phoronix

AMD Radeon VII Review
Lucky number seven? Nvidia and AMD share what amounts to a duopoly for discrete graphics cards. Depending on which market-research bulletin you care to follow, Nvidia outsells AMD by a factor of 2:1, though with the latter having gained arguably more share through the cryptocurrency-led boom that peaked just over a year ago.

However, post-boom and things are not so rosy. Both companies have excess inventory in the channel while Nvidia's all-new RTX series has got off to a faltering start, handily exemplifying a case of potent hardware pre-empting widely-available software.

What such commentary disguises is that AMD doesn't have a play in the genuine premium end of the graphics-card market. The >$500 space, though admittedly small in volume but great for marketing, is dominated by two generations of Nvidia GPUs.


Read full article @ Hexus

AMD Radeon VII Review
Its no secret that over the last two years AMD hasn?t been able to truly compete in the enthusiast graphics space. While they are taking market share away from Intel in the CPU world thanks to their incredible Ryzen CPUs (love my Ryzen 7 1700, by the way), the companys flagship consumer card, the Vega 64, failed to capture the high end market as many consumers were hoping for.


Read full article @ MMORPG

AMD Radeon VII Review
After a month-long wait following its announcement during the AMD keynote at CES, the Radeon VII is finally here. By now you probably know that this is the world’s first 7nm gaming GPU, and it is launching today at a price equal to NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 2080 at $699.

The AMD Radeon VII in action on the test bench
More than a gaming card, the Radeon VII is being positioned as a card for content creators as well by AMD, with its 16GB of fast HBM2 memory and enhanced compute capabilities complimenting what should be significantly improved gaming performance compared to the RX Vega 64.
Vega at 7nm
At the heart of the Radeon VII is the Vega 20 GPU, introduced with the Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 compute cards for the professional market back in November. The move to 7nm brings a reduction in die size from 495 mm2 with Vega 10 to 331 mm2 with Vega 20, but this new GPU is more than a die shrink with the most notable improvement by way of memory throughput, as this is significantly higher with Vega 20.


Read full article @ PC Perspective

AMD Radeon VII Review: 7nm Vega With 16GB HBM2 Benchmarked
Although it is still based on the company’s Vega architecture, the GPU powering the new AMD Radeon VII isn’t a simply shrink of an existing design. There have been enhancements made to the GPU that not only improve efficiency and rendering performance, but compute performance as well. The GPU’s dynamic clock and frequency gating technology is also more robust, faster to change states, and has more granular control over the GPU. There are benefits that come by way of the shrink to 7nm as well, including a smaller die area, which enabled AMD to upgrade the memory configuration over the Radeon RX Vega 64, while maintaining roughly the same footprint...


Read full article @ HotHardware

Aukey GH-S5 7.1 Virtual Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review
Looking for a headset that's good value for money? It may be worth checking out the Aukey GH-S5 7.1 Virtual Surround Sound Headset.


Read full article @ Wccftech

Cooler Master MK730 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review
We love a good mechanical gaming keyboard here at eTeknix. Fortunately, it seems like Cooler Master is on a roll, releasing one great keyboard after another right now. Their latest is the Cooler Master MK730, which is launching this week!


Read full article @ eTeknix

Cooler Master MK850 Mechanical Keyboard Review
The Cooler Master MK850 is an excellent mechanical keyboard in its own right that breathes a fresh air of innovation with its Aimpad technology enabled keys.


Read full article @ APH Networks

Das Keyboard 5Q Review
Mechanical keyboards are largely the same. Coming from the resident keyboard geek, that probably sounds like heresy but let's face it: it's hard to break meaningful ground is a peripheral that's been such a mainstay of our computer use. Well, that's exactly what Das Keyboard has done with the the brand new 5Q. It may just be the world's first smart keyboard and aims to not only help you communicate but to communicate with you.


Read full article @ MMORPG

Drevo Tyrfing V2 and Durendal 104 Key RGB Mechanical Keyboards Review
Hey guys, today we have not one but two mechanical keyboards to review, the Drevo Tyrfing V2 which is a 104 key update to the tenkeyless original and the Drevo Durendal 104 Key Keyboards


Read full article @ Play3r

HP EX950 2TB SSD Review
Since looking at the 1TB HP EX950 last month, we tested two other next-generation NVMe SSDs from Western Digital and Samsung. The three drives join a growing list of high-performance products new for 2019.


Read full article @ TweakTown

MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z 6G Review
Let's start off with the performance delivered by the MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z 6G. With higher out of the box clock speeds than the NVIDIA RTX 2060 FE it outperforms the Founders Edition card at each turn. As it should! That being said, the FPS margins the MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z 6G holds over the FE card are not huge, but it's enough to make the point.


Read full article @ OCC

Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 5
More good stuff: A fifth review slash report of my Slimbook Pro2 & Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver experience following a series of meaningful, real-life use cases, including overall impression, stability, performance, power management, lots of awesome games, various bugs, and more. Enjoy.


Read full article @ Dedoimedo

T-Force Delta TUF Gaming RGB Memory Review
Today, we have a kit of memory from Taiwan based firm Team Group to review. 16GB in 2x 8GB DIMMs, promising high quality memory chips, good overclocking, and that good old 2018 trope, RGB. We'll be putting it through the proverbial wringer, so to speak, in the following pages.


Read full article @ The Guru of 3D

Team Group T-Force Delta TUF Gaming RGB 3200 MHz Review
Team Group joins the TUF Gaming Alliance with a specially branded version of their excellent T-Force Delta RGB memory. At 3200 MHz CAS 16, the T-Force Delta TUF Gaming RGB promises solid performance at a reasonable price.


Read full article @ TechPowerUp

The AMD Radeon VII Review: An Unexpected Shot At The High-End
After releasing a late-generation product refresh in November in the form of the Radeon RX 590, we had expected AMDs consumer side to be done for a while. Instead, AMD made a rather unexpected announcement at CES 2019 last month: the company would be releasing a new high-end consumer card, the Radeon VII (Seven). Positioned as their latest flagship graphics card for gamers and content creators alike, it would once agian be AMD’s turn to court enthusiast gamers. Now launching today – on the 7th, appropriately enough – were taking a look at AMDs latest card, to see how the Radeon VII measures up to the challenge.


Read full article @ Anandtech




Printed from Linux Compatible (https://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/amd_radeon_vii_16gb_graphics_card_reviews_and_more.html)