You can snag a 39" 4K display for $404 and more
Posted on: 01/17/2014 12:19 PM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles, including You can snag a 39" 4K display for $404, ASUS RT-AC56U & USB-AC56 802.11AC Review, AMD A10-7850K vs. Intel/AMD CPU/APU Comparison, Corsair Flash Voyager GO 32GB micro-USB Flash Drive Review, and Toshiba FlashAir Class10 Wi-Fi SD Card Review

You can snag a 39" 4K display for $404 @ The Tech Report
The other day, my friend and fellow PC enthusiast Andy Brown pinged me and told me I needed to come over to his house to see his new toy: a 39" 4K display that he ordered from Amazon for 500 bucks. Coming from anybody else, I'd have been deeply skeptical of this purchase, but Andy is actually the co-founder of TR and has impeccable taste in such matters.

Turns out this was no joke.


Read more: You can snag a 39" 4K display for $404 @ The Tech Report

ASUS RT-AC56U & USB-AC56 802.11AC Review @ Hardware Canucks
As the latest additions to ASUS’ quickly expanding 802.11AC family, the RT-AC56 and USB-AC56 are meant to redefine the budget-friendly wireless networking device segment. While one is a router and the other a USB add-on, they’re essentially two pieces of the same puzzle and are looking to offer up a more affordable Wireless AC high bandwidth solution to folks who can’t afford the top of the line RT-AC68U / PCE-AC68 solution or slightly lower priced RT-AC66U.

With a marketplace already filled with high quality, great performing mainstream routers and easy to use USB wireless adapters, manufactures are searching for ways to make their new models stand out. Unlike buyers interested in halo or ‘flagship’ models, mainstream consumer base their purchasing decisions on one major theme: value. Value in performance vs. price, value in the extra features that are included and even how much of their valuable time can be saved with an easy installation procedure.


Read more: ASUS RT-AC56U & USB-AC56 802.11AC Review @ Hardware Canucks

Logitech G600 MMO Gaming Mouse Review @ OCC
The mouse really is all that and a bag of chips. You've got your standard mouse functionality followed up with an added tilt wheel and twelve buttons to do nearly anything you can come up with. You have the option to use the G-Shift button to add in a full second set of 19 buttons as well as a mode selector to add in basically two more sets of twelve to the game. You can set three saved profiles to the mouse to take with you on the go and additional to your local machine for all the games and programs you desire. The Logitech G600 is quite the work of art in more than just the gaming world.


Read more: Logitech G600 MMO Gaming Mouse Review @ OCC

AMD A10-7850K vs. Intel/AMD CPU/APU Comparison @ Phoronix
Two days ago AMD launched their "Kaveri" APUs to mixed reactions. On launch-day we provided a Linux overview of the AMD A10-7850K APU and followed that with an Ubuntu Linux vs. Windows 8.1 performance comparison for this top-end Kaveri APU. Yesterday was then the AMD Kaveri APU compared to discrete AMD/NVIDIA GPUs and now today we've finally had the time to finish the tests most people have been looking forward to: the A10-7850K comparison against various other AMD and Intel CPU/APUs. These Linux tests cover a range of both processor and graphics testing from Ubuntu 14.04 across a wide selection of Intel and AMD hardware.



Read more: AMD A10-7850K vs. Intel/AMD CPU/APU Comparison @ Phoronix

NZXT Kraken G10 Liquid Cooling GPU Adapter Review @ HiTech Legion
What’s hiding in your closet? If you are a system builder, probably a number of components that you have “outgrown”, or have become obsolete. More than likely, many of them are still fully functional and you saved them because they may serve a purpose at some point., like that GTs 240 you are hanging onto in case you need to throw together a build for your mom. Then there is the Cooler Master Hyper 212 you replaced with an Antec 620 that you replaced with a Swiftech H220…..wait, an Antec 620?

Many people who went into the first round of closed loop coolers quickly outgrew them as the products available changed very, very rapidly. I personally know quite a few people with 120mm solutions in their closets that are fully functional, but were quickly replaced by 240mm when they became more readily available, or simply switched back to air cooling when the 120mm didn’t live up to performance of the NH-D14 they had replaced. Whatever the reason, there are a lot of these lying around. It seems that people hate to part with them, but they really can’t figure out a viable use for them, either. We already know that even small AiO coolers work very well on GPUs, but there has always been the matter of getting them to fit, and of cooling the VRM. That suddenly just got a whole lot easier.


Read more: NZXT Kraken G10 Liquid Cooling GPU Adapter Review @ HiTech Legion

MP4Nation Brainwavz S1 @ techPowerUp
MP4Nation has been manufacturing quality budget in-ears for a while, and they hope to take a good chunk of the mid-fi earphone market with the $60 S1s. The S1s use a 10mm driver in a well-designed housing and come with a flat cable, which is neat for people on the go.


Read more: MP4Nation Brainwavz S1 @ techPowerUp

Tenda W1800R Wireless AC1750 Dual-Band Gigabit Router @ NikKTech
Much like everything around us wireless technology also keeps evolving every day and with it so do all related devices such as routers, modem/routers, repeaters, access points, Wi-Fi dongles and much more. Now i can't say that I'm much of a Wi-Fi person myself since i have and will probably always prefer wired connections over wireless ones for many reasons (mainly however because of increased safety and speeds) but i know that the same doesn't apply to most people. Recently we saw the introduction of the latest 802.11ac standard (backwards compatible with b/g/n devices) which promises much higher throughput and data rates compared to the previous standard (802.11n). The W1800R Wireless AC1750 Dual-Band Gigabit Router by Tenda is the 2nd router to make it on our test bench with support for the new standard and today we are taking it for a quick ride to see how it does.


Read more: Tenda W1800R Wireless AC1750 Dual-Band Gigabit Router @ NikKTech

Cooler Master Nepton 280L Liquid Cooling System Review @ Frostytech
Coolermaster's Nepton 280L is the best performing all-in-one CPU watercooler Frostytech has tested... thus far. More surprisingly for us, the Nepton 280L managed to rise to the top of the 200W Intel LGA2011, 150W & 85W Intel LGA115x/775 and 125W AMD synthetic thermal heatsink test results charts. After testing +750 CPU thermal solutions, it's kind of nice to be surprised.


Read more: Cooler Master Nepton 280L Liquid Cooling System Review @ Frostytech

Corsair Flash Voyager GO 32GB micro-USB Flash Drive Review @ Legit Reviews
Last week at the Consumer Electronics Show, Corsair announced the Flash Voyager GO USB 3.0 flash drive in 64GB, 32GB, and 16GB capacities. This drive was developed to make it simple to share movies, photos and videos between Android powered devices and the traditional PC. The magic to making this work is that this particular series of flash drives has both a USB and a micro-USB connector on it, so you can easily transfer your data from say a PC or notebook to any device that has a micro-USB port that has OTG support. Read on to see how it works and performs in our latest review.


Read more: Corsair Flash Voyager GO 32GB micro-USB Flash Drive Review @ Legit Reviews

NZXT Phantom 530 Case (Red) Review @ KitGuru
Today we are taking a look at the NZXT Phantom 530. As the direct successor to the original Phantom, the Phantom 530 aims to impress with support for radiators up to 360 mm in size, graphics cards up to 444 mm in length, CPU coolers up to 183 mm in height and a whopping 34 mm of cable management clearance. Retailing for £104,99 inc vat (http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CA-130-NX) ., is the Phantom 530 a worthy successor?


Read more: NZXT Phantom 530 Case (Red) Review @ KitGuru

be quiet! Dark Rock 2 CPU Cooler @ TechwareLabs.com
be quiet! as the name implies, is a company focused on silence. Whether it be power supplies, case fans, or CPU coolers, this group of German engineers is obsessive about providing the maximum possible performance while maintaining absolutely silent running. They're so confident in their performance, in fact, that they set us up with a FLIR E6 thermographic camera so that we could see first-hand how well their products perform. Today we're going to be taking a look at their flagship CPU cooler, the Dark Rock 2.


Read more: be quiet! Dark Rock 2 CPU Cooler @ TechwareLabs.com

ASUS R9 270X DirectCU II TOP Video Card Review @ ThinkComputers.org
Here we are back with another graphics card review. Today we are taking a look at ASUS's R9 270X DirectCU II Top Graphics Card. AMD's R9 270X cards are of course based off the same 28nm Pitcairn GPU that we saw in the Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition graphics card. As the name of this card indicates it will feature's ASUS's own DirectCU II cooling solution, which should offer better thermals than AMD's stock cooler while also producing less noise. This is also a TOP edition card so it is factory overclocked with the core clock being bumped up from 1050 MHz to 1120 MHz. The 2 GB of onboard GDDR5 remains at the same 5600 MHz (effective) as the reference design. Is this the R9 270X that you are looking for? Read on to find out


Read more: ASUS R9 270X DirectCU II TOP Video Card Review @ ThinkComputers.org

Toshiba FlashAir Class10 Wi-Fi SD Card Review @ Madshrimps
The FlashAir Wi-Fi SDHC from Toshiba is available in different capacities of 8GB, 16GB or 32GB, features a well-developed interface for easy access from both our PC and mobile devices without the need of using an extra app and is also built with the Internet Pass Thru functionality for being able to browse the web while being connected to the newly connected network.


Read more: Toshiba FlashAir Class10 Wi-Fi SD Card Review @ Madshrimps

AMD A10-7850K And A8-7600: Kaveri Gives Us A Taste Of HSA @ Toms Hardware
We've spent the days following CES benchmarking two of AMD's new Kaveri-based APUs. Do the Steamroller x86 architecture, GCN graphics design, and HSA-oriented features impress, or do they come up short against Intel's value-oriented Haswell-based parts?


Read more: AMD A10-7850K And A8-7600: Kaveri Gives Us A Taste Of HSA @ Toms Hardware

Gigabyte Aivia Uranium Review @ Hexus
Exploring the ins and outs of Gigabyte's range-topping wireless gaming mouse.

Gigabyte may be best known around these parts as a purveyor of high-quality motherboards and graphics cards, but over the course of the past few months, the Taiwanese tech giant has been making inroads into the world of PC gaming peripherals.

It's an area of the market that's becoming increasingly competitive - anyone who's anyone plans to release keyboards and mice in 2014 - but Gigabyte is one of the select few who has the financial backing to roll out something a little different to the norm.


Read more: Gigabyte Aivia Uranium Review @ Hexus

Kingston HyperX Predator 2x4GB DDR3-2800 CL12 1.65V Review @ ocaholic
Over the last couple of years, Kingston have been a frequent guest to our test lab. After some ups and downs, it’s time we take a look at another item in the HyperX lineup, namely, the current DDR3-2800 flagship to judge whether it’s a serious contender or just another prestige item.


Read more: Kingston HyperX Predator 2x4GB DDR3-2800 CL12 1.65V Review @ ocaholic




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