Server management with SharePoint 2013 and more
Posted on: 01/28/2013 10:27 AM

Here today's reviews and articles, including Server management with SharePoint 2013, Linux 3.2 To 3.8 Kernels With Intel Ivy Bridge Graphics, Corsair Hydro 90 & H110 Review, Matrox TripleHead2Go Digital SE External Multi-Display Adapter Review, and PC Power and Cooling MK III Silencer 750 review

Server management with SharePoint 2013 @ Techradar
One of the major components of the new version of SharePoint 2013 is that it will use the concept of apps familiar to smartphone and tablet users. This is a radical move that could make server management and feature extension much easier to manage. The new version of SharePoint 2013 is a major upgrade, and IT managers need to carefully consider how it could benefit their organsations, and if the new app platform is worth committing to.


Read more: Server management with SharePoint 2013 @ Techradar

Linux 3.2 To 3.8 Kernels With Intel Ivy Bridge Graphics @ Phoronix
With the Intel Haswell product launch coming up soon, here's a look at how the Intel "Ivy Bridge" HD 4000 graphics support has matured on the seven most recent Linux kernel releases. This benchmarking shows how the performance of the Intel DRM driver has changed between the Linux 3.2 kernel and the Linux 3.8 kernel that's presently under development when using the integrated graphics found on the latest-generation Core i7 CPU.

While this article is just looking at the kernel-side performance impact of using Intel HD 4000 graphics on a Core i7 3770K "Ivy Bridge" processor, similar benchmarks on the same hardware looking at the recent Mesa Intel DRI driver releases will be coming out next week. Beyond that, similar benchmarks but updated looks at NVIDIA GeForce on Nouveau and AMD Radeon graphics hardware is coming out soon too, with this being an interesting time due to the forthcoming Linux 3.8 kernel release and Mesa 9.1 setting to ship in late February.


Read more: Linux 3.2 To 3.8 Kernels With Intel Ivy Bridge Graphics @ Phoronix

Corsair Hydro 90 & H110 Review - 140mm Cooling Power @ Madshrimps
Corsair just recently launched a brand new Hydro series with the H80i and H100i units, both coolers being updated versions of their predecessors, not alone being overhauled in the cooling/pump block design, but also the addition of the new CORSAIR AIR Static Pressure fans was a big plus for the new Hydro i series. Secondly the LINK software was now directly supported, without the need of buying the optional Command Control set. The new features boosted the cooling performance and versatility for end-user adjustment. To our big surprise, two brand new Hydro units arrived on our doorstep. The Hydro 90 and 110, both being optimized for extreme cooling performances. Weirdly enough these brand new coolers are not based on the latest Hydro I series, but seem at first glance a revamp of the older Hydro 70 design, manufactured by ASETEK for CORSAIR. Biggest innovation is the usage of a 140mm radiator and ditto fan, instead of the 120mm version we are so accustomed too. More radiator surface should enhance the cooling capacity. Let's find out how these two Hydro units perform...


Read more: Corsair Hydro 90 & H110 Review - 140mm Cooling Power @ Madshrimps

LEETGION El'Druin Gaming Mouse Review @ Madshrimps
The new El’Druin Gaming Mouse from LEETGION features an unusual appearance and is equipped with a SPAD on the left (Skill Power Action D-Pad) and on the right the Omni-Tuner. The mouse is shipped with interchangeable palm rests and the central mouse sensor comes from Avago, model 9500, which permits DPI ranges to be adjusted from 100 to 5000.


Read more: LEETGION El'Druin Gaming Mouse Review @ Madshrimps

Matrox TripleHead2Go Digital SE External Multi-Display Adapter Review @ OCC
The Matrox TripleHead2Go Digital SE is built like a tank! The thick black metal casing and clever, minimalistic design give this device a certain charm of its own. Short of using some power tools there is no way normal usage could risk to damage the unit. The connectors and ports are well positioned and feel very solid with no flimsiness or wobbling. The rubber feet are a welcome touch to counter any sliding on most desk surfaces.


Read more: Matrox TripleHead2Go Digital SE External Multi-Display Adapter Review @ OCC

Swiftech H220 Advanced AiO Liquid CPU Cooler Review @ Hi Tech Legion
In the world of enthusiast liquid cooling, there is no question that Swiftech is the big dog in the meat house. For almost twenty years, Swiftech has been devoted to the pursuit of cooling excellence. They have produced some absolutely legendary air and liquid products over the years, and have set their sights mainly on the development of liquid cooling over the past ten. It seemed odd that when AiO liquid coolers gained popularity, Swiftech was absent from the market. That has changed, and the big dog in the meat house is acting like just that and delivering, by far, the most advanced AiO to hit the market to date.

Swiftech’s first foray into the AiO market, the H220, makes a profound and definitive statement regarding their expertise and experience in liquid cooling. The Swiftech H220 takes the entire concept of AiO liquid cooling to another level by featuring enthusiast class components combined with the ability to open the loop to add components. Properly offering an open loop is far more involved than the H220’s simple inclusion of 3/8” swivel barb tubing connections, it involves the inclusion of a high head pressure pump capable of reliably keeping the flow going to added radiators and cooling blocks. A copper cooling block offers a very large, nicely polished contact surface. The Swiftech H220’s pump is far meatier than we have seen in AiO offerings, and is PWM controlled with rated speeds of 1200-3000rpm. Keeping in line with enthusiast level components, the 240mm radiator uses brass channels with copper (rather than aluminum) fins for incredible heat dissipation capabilities. Handling the airflow are two 120mm Swiftech PWM fans with a range of 800-1800rpm, capable of pushing out 55 CFM with very high static pressure of 2.29 mmH2O. In keeping the H220 quiet, the included fans top out at less than 33 dBA, but more importantly, the radiator has been designed for optimal cooling with drastically decreased noise. The Swiftech H220 comes fully assembled and filled out of the box, with included mounting hardware for all current Intel and AMD processors. The H220 is also guaranteed maintenance free for the duration of its 3-Year warranty.



Read more: Swiftech H220 Advanced AiO Liquid CPU Cooler Review @ Hi Tech Legion

Thermaltake Level 10M Gaming Mouse @ Benchmark Reviews
Gamers drive the desktop computer industry. It's true, just like luxury and performance cars drive the rest of the automotive market. Performance and feature innovations that appear first on the likes of Ferrari and Lexus trickle down to lower end cars after their development has been subsidized by the purchasers of the higher end cars. A similar phenomenon exists in the computer industry. It's most noticeable with video cards, but it affects other items as well-- look at how computer cases have advanced in the past few years.


Read more: Thermaltake Level 10M Gaming Mouse @ Benchmark Reviews

MyDigitalSSD BP4 mSATA SSD Review (240GB) ? Best Value Available For an SSD To Date @ SSD Review
Perhaps one of the hottest tech items to hit in the last year is the ultrabook, a laptop typically measuring under 1/2″ thick, weighing less than 3 lbs, having performance as high as 1GB/s transfer speeds and being capable of up to ten hours battery life.

As new and amazing as the ultra is, the consumer also learned of the solid state drive and, more specifically, the mSATA SSD measuring 1/3 the size of a credit card, just over 3mm thick and weighing just under 7gm.

As with any other new technology, such things as storage capacity are considered premium and, even now, we are seeing systems sell for as much as $500-$750 more, simply the result of a storage upgrade from 120 to 240GB. The smart consumer is one who buys the lower capacity system with full intent of upgrading the SSD themselves and, in doing so, saves themselves hundreds of dollars.


Read more: MyDigitalSSD BP4 mSATA SSD Review (240GB) ? Best Value Available For an SSD To Date @ SSD Review

PC Power and Cooling MK III Silencer 750 review @ Guru3D
We review the PC Power and Cooling MK III Silencer 750 Watt review from OCZ technology. The Silencer Mk III series are all about being quiet, being awesome and very efficient and again, the PSU as tested today carries a Gold certification. The PSU also improved on the audibility front as it comes with a switch, enabled it and up-to 350 Watt the fan will remain disabled and at that load your PSU merely lukewarm. The 750 PSU is lovely in performance, the one massive 62A 12-volts says it all really. Excellent for multi-GPU solutions and hardcore overclockers. The PSU is engineered with merely premium components, including Japanese 105°C capacitors and heavy-duty protection circuitries.

It's now Winter 2013 and PC Power & Cooling is offering a new modular power supply that is Gold certified, and its armed with the looks to kill, the all new Silencer Mk III in the 750 Watt flavor.

The Silencer Mk III series are all about being quiet, being awesome and very efficient and again, the PSU as tested today carries a Gold certification. Bronze, Silver but really Gold or Platinum is what you want, however the upper stack in hardware is expensive.


Read more: PC Power and Cooling MK III Silencer 750 review @ Guru3D

How to buy a new server @ Techradar
How old are the servers your company is using? Research from market intelligence firm IDC indicates a continuing trend to extend the lifespan of a typical server by at least two years past its recommended replacement date. Businesses are under financial pressure, but with the quantity of data exploding, delaying the server refresh cycle could undermine their ability to compete.IDC commented: While stretching the life of servers and other hardware can be beneficial in terms of reducing capital expenses, IT organisations must consider operational expenses. In many cases, extending the life of servers too long can lead to an increase in operational expenses that could pay for investments in new technology. Before simply delaying new hardware purchases, organisations need to assess the impact on both capital budgets and operational budgets.The demands of business intelligence and new levels of data, leading companies to generate terabytes of information, also creates the pressure for new servers.


Read more: How to buy a new server @ Techradar


Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/server_management_with_sharepoint_2013_and_more.html)