OCZ Vertex 460 SSD Reviews and more
Posted on: 01/23/2014 01:09 PM

Here a roundup of today's reviews, including OCZ Vertex 460 SSD reviews, Corsair Obsidian 250D mITX Cube Computer Case Review, Testing Out The Configurable TDP On AMD's Kaveri, Func KB-460 Gaming Keyboard, and Asus PQ321Q 4K Monitor Review: Top-Shelf Ultra HD For $3500

Corsair Obsidian 250D mITX Cube Computer Case Review @ Madshrimps
Formerly known as a pure RAM manufacturing giant, Corsair has expanded their lineup big time over the past years; the product range is now ranging from RAM, PSU's, enclosures, gaming peripherals to even air/processor coolers. The cases covering from budget friendly till ultra high end versions. From basic mini towers till full blown full-tower models. Though the industry never stands still and formats tend to change. Corsair couldn't be left behind in the mITX race; hence why they released a mITX case version in the form of the Obsidian 250D on January the 8th. Today we are proud to introduce you to Corsair's latest sibling: The Obsidian 250D.


Read more: Corsair Obsidian 250D mITX Cube Computer Case Review @ Madshrimps

Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB SSD Review @ TechwareLabs.com
The SSD market is literally saturated with competitors, and with SSDs being one of the "must-have" items these days, it's easier to get overwhelmed with trying to decide which make/model of SSD to go with in your system. Many people initially approach this from a pure cost standpoint, which is has been a common approach when shopping for HDD's in the past. Unfortunately, this approach can be dangerous when applied to shopping for your first/next SSD, as cheaper more than likely guarantees you end up with an inferior drive as it relates to performance, compatibility, and endurance. So what's the safest general approach? Avoiding a lengthy write up, you're safest approach is to look to companies that have been successful in the memory market. Since SSD's leverage memory technology, over spinning platters, it stands to reason that memory companies have initially more experience. With that said, we will be taking a look at Kingston's HyperX 3K 240GB SSD in this review.


Read more: Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB SSD Review @ TechwareLabs.com

OCZ Vertex 460 240 GB Solid State Drive Review @ ThinkComputers.org
2013 was another rough year for OCZ, they went bankrupt and their assets were sold off to Toshiba. We were not sure if we would ever see the OCZ name again, but it looks like OCZ is not going anywhere. With such a popular name know for great performance Toshiba is keeping OCZ around and their first product for 2014 is the Vertex 460 solid state drive. We happen to be taking a look at the 240GB version today. The Vertex 460 features the same Barefoot 3 M10 controller as we saw in the Vertex 450 drive, but has new Toshiba 19nm MLC toggle mode NAND. Now that Toshiba owns OCZ and is loading drives with their own flash this is going to bring costs down for the consumer. The Vertex 460 also really focuses on mixed workload and sustained performance. Will the Vertex 460 start off the year right for OCZ? Read on as we find out!


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 240 GB Solid State Drive Review @ ThinkComputers.org

OCZ Vertex 460 240GB Solid State Drive Review @ HotHardware.com
We had originally planned to start this review off with a brief discussion of OCZ's potential fate and what the company's recent bankruptcy and looming acquisition by Toshiba could mean for its future. But in the 11th hour yesterday, news came through that the acquisition was complete and OCZ would go on producing solid state storage products and that it was now a "wholly owned subsidiary and Toshiba Group Company". We've even got a fresh new logo to show you.

Fittingly, the first product released after the announcement, and the drive we'll be showing you here, features all home-grown OCZ tech and bleeding edge 19nm Toshiba-built MLC NAND flash memory. The just announced OCZ Vertex 460 series drives will be available soon in 120GB - 480GB flavors and we've got the full scoop for you all here...


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 240GB Solid State Drive Review @ HotHardware.com

BitFenix Phenom M @ techPowerUp
BitFenix has taken the frame of the Prodigy M and now offers its genes in the Phenom Micro-ATX chassis aiming to offer a clean, understated, but compact option to those who need storage drives and the ability to include potent hardware.


Read more: BitFenix Phenom M @ techPowerUp

OCZ Vertex 460 SSD Review (240GB) Enterprise Performance With an Amazing Price @ The SSD Review
Only hours after the OCZ Storage Solutions has been announced as the newest member of the Toshiba Group Company, , OCZ is releasing a brand new 460 Series SSD, relying on new partnerships and Toshiba NAND flash memory. If anything, the OCZ story is sure to make an interesting novel one day but, the release of this SSD shows us that the OCZ team has become very good at staying on the right track and deflecting what some might consider serious diversions. Their possession of what might be one of the world’s top SSD controllers, the Barefoot 3, might have a great deal to do with that.


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 SSD Review (240GB) Enterprise Performance With an Amazing Price @ The SSD Review

OCZ Vertex 460 240GB SSD Review @ Legit Reviews
Legit Reviews is checking out the new OCZ Storage Solutions Vertex 460 SSD today! We received a 240GB version this time around for evaluation which is pretty much the typical size of a review sample anymore. The Vertex 460 carries the same Barefoot 3 M10 controller we saw in the Vertex 450 and is now paired with 19nm Toshiba MLC NAND. The performance specifications are impressive for what is essentially an entry-level performance drive with reads hitting 545MB/s max and 525MB/s writes max. Read on to see how it performs!


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 240GB SSD Review @ Legit Reviews

OCZ Vertex 460 SSD Launch Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Today OCZ are refreshing their Vertex series drives, bringing in the Vertex 460. This drive still uses OCZ's own controller but mixes in new 19nm MLC to the range and boosts the I/O spec as well as adding performance tweaks. Today we compare it to a range of other solutions all vying for SSD upgraders and newbies.


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 SSD Launch Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

OCZ Vertex 460 120 GB Review @ ocaholic
The Vertex 460 marks a new chapter in the history of OCZ. Meanwhile Toshiba has bought OCZ and the company now operates under the name OCZ Storage Solutions as a subsidiary of Toshiba. When it comes to the Vertex 460, we have basically a Vertex 450 lying in front of us with the latest NAND flash memory from Toshiba. Other than that the firmware needed to be upgraded an optimized in order to sequeeze maximum performance out of the drive.


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 120 GB Review @ ocaholic

OCZ Vertex 460 120GB SSD review @ Guru3D
OCZ just released the Vertex 460 SSD series with an architecture closer to the Vector 150. It comes with a lot of the same features yet, maybe a hint less performance, but all at a better price. Based on the Indilinx Barefoot 3 controller we test the 120 GB NAND flash memory based model. The end result is an SSD that is very fast and competitive in terms of pricing, combine that with endurance and you have gotten yourself the golden mix for the Vertex460.


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 120GB SSD review @ Guru3D

OCZ Vertex 460 (240GB) Review @ Anandtech
The last few months have not been easy at OCZ. After long-lasting financial issues, the company filed for bankruptcy on November 27th and a week later Toshiba announced that it will be acquiring the assets for $35 million. OCZ is currently surrounded by uncertainty, at least from a consumer's perspective. Thedetails of the acquisition are scarce at best and OCZ only announced that Toshiba will be funding them to ensure normal operation during the acquisition process. I was hoping to have an update about OCZ's situation (especially about existing product warranties) but I was told by OCZ that they can't shed any light on the deal until it closes. Assuming the acquisition process is on schedule, we should expect to hear more in the next couple of weeks. Meanwhile,OCZ continues to do business as usual and the Vertex 460 is a sign of that. Already showcased at CES a couple weeks ago, the drive is now ready for release. Read on to find out how the drive performs!


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 (240GB) Review @ Anandtech

OCZ Vertex 460 SSD review: high-end performance, mid-range price @ Hardware.Info
Early November OCZ upgraded its Vector SSDs with a new generation firmware and 19nm Toshiba flash memory, releasing the Vector 150. Today OCZ's affordable series of SSDs received a similar upgrade. The new Vertex 460 is replacing the Vertex 450 with the same formula as the 150: new flash, slightly faster and more affordable.

The new Vertex 460 uses the Indilinx Barefoot 3 M10 controller like the 450. It's identical to the Barefoot 3 M00 in the Vector and Vector 150 SSDs, but has a lower clock frequency. The main difference between the Vertex 450 and Vertex 460 is the switch from Micron 20nm Onfi MLC NAND flash memory to Toshiba 19nm MLC ToggleFlash. The 19nm flash is a bit cheaper, but also slower. To compensate for that OCZ applies overprovisioning. Whereas the Vertex 450 is available in 128GB, 256GB and 512GB capacities, the new Vertex 460 comes in 120GB, 240GB and 480GB. The new SSDs are at least as affordable as their predecessors.


Read more: OCZ Vertex 460 SSD review: high-end performance, mid-range price @ Hardware.Info

Testing Out The Configurable TDP On AMD's Kaveri @ Phoronix
AMD Kaveri APUs offer a configurable TDP to target running the APU at lower power rating and this feature can be configured on supported motherboards. While the configurable TDP is targeted for the lower-end Kaveri APUs, I ran some tests from the A10-7850K when bumping its TDP from 95 Watts to 45 to 65 Watts to see how the performance is impacted.

According to AMD the A10-7850K isn't optimized for a configurable TDP but is billed as a feature for the lower-end A8-7600. However, the ASUS motherboard UEFI still allowed manipulating the TDP value for the A10-7850K and so I ran some tests. The ASUS A88X-PRO allowed setting a TDP value in the range of 45 to 65 Watts and I ended up running benchmarks on a five Watt stepping. Some AMD motherboards just offer a 45 Watt or 65 Watt option, but the ASUS A88X-PRO at least allows for greater control of the TDP.


Read more: Testing Out The Configurable TDP On AMD's Kaveri @ Phoronix

Flir E6 Thermal Infrared Camera Review @ TechwareLabs.com
For as long as I've been aware of thermal cameras I have wanted one. In addition to being a really cool piece of technology it is uber useful. In my work at TechwareLabs.com we review a LOT of hardware, pretty much anything that uses electricity. That means heat, and at times quite a bit of it. Wouldn't it be handy to see the heat that any given object puts off? You could isolate sources of heat and cold, find out if one part is hotter than another and get its exact temperature within 0.06 degrees C. For the more analytical among us it would be cool to see if those larger heatpipes actually convey more heat no pun intended. Introducing the E6 from Flir, a Thermal Imager for your needs.


Read more: Flir E6 Thermal Infrared Camera Review @ TechwareLabs.com

Func KB-460 Gaming Keyboard @ LanOC Reviews
If you’ve been around PC gaming long enough you recognize the Func brand from their award winning mousepads which all but defined the industry. Func is back again and this time they aim to bring that functional styling to an entire range of gaming peripherals. Today we take a look at the KB-460 mechanical gaming keyboard which aims to be the perfect blend of gaming performance and functionality. Will this fresh look serve Func well or are they destined to be a one hit wonder? We'll find out.


Read more: Func KB-460 Gaming Keyboard @ LanOC Reviews

BitFenix Phenom Mini-ITX Chassis Review @ eTeknix
BitFenix are still a dominating force when it comes to the Mini-ITX form factor, their Prodigy chassis was a massive success and while it may be compatible with small motherboards it was popular due to its larger interior. The new Phenom chassis takes the concept of the Prodigy and gives it a great refresh, the bulk of the design is very close to the Prodigy, but with a promise of cleaner looks and a few other minor revisions it could be enough to tempt people to invest.

This chassis is part of the BitFenix trilogy of small form factors chassis. The first case was the Prodigy, then we have the Phenom and the final one will be the Colosus. Then of course we have the second editions of these chassis which support the m-ATX form factor while maintaining the same exterior dimensions. All of the chassis are fundamentally the same, the three Mini-ITX cases for example have almost identical interiors with new exterior panels based around the Prodigy. The m-ATX editions again have similar interiors with exterior panels that match their Mini-ITX counterparts.


Read more: BitFenix Phenom Mini-ITX Chassis Review @ eTeknix

Seagate Backup Plus Slim External USB 3.0 2TB Hard Drive Review @ PC Stats
The focus of this PCSTATS review is Seagate's 2TB Backup Plus Slim external USB 3.0 hard drive. The Backup Plus Slim is a self-contained 2.5" SATA-600 interface hard drive in a black aluminum and plastic enclosure which connects via USB 3.0 cable to any PC or Mac computer. The whole package weighs 150 grams and is just over 12mm thick - about the size of a smart phone. Power for the drive is supplied via the USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 port. The Backup Plus Slim looks every bit like the Monolith from Kubrick's 2001:A Space Odyssey, but inside is a not particularly remarkable 5400RPM, 3-platter hard disk with 32MB of cache.


Read more: Seagate Backup Plus Slim External USB 3.0 2TB Hard Drive Review @ PC Stats

Nvidia Grid: Is It The Future Of High Performance Computing? @ eTeknix
When the eTeknix team visited CES 2014, there was one word that we heard more than any other, one big focus that it seems many big tech companies – especially gaming tech companies – are trying to promote, “cloud”. Now I’m sure many of you will agree that saying something is in the cloud is just a bit of clever marketing.By any definition, the whole internet is in the cloud and we’ve been using its features for a very long time. The concept of remotely accessing powerful computers via a virtual data centre from say… your home, is nothing strange either, and it’s the very basis of the technology that is used to run everything from Facebook to YouTube. On the professional side, we have industries such as science, oil & gas and construction, to name a few, that require high performance computing to drastically reduce the time required to perform large complex calculations or to generate 3D computational models.

Gaming could offer one of the biggest changes in the industry of cloud computing, at least as far as your average consumer is concerned, but could cloud computing give us all access to superior gaming by offloading the processing to the cloud? As well as offloading rendering and other graphics intensive applications for businesses? Nvidia certainly think so.


Read more: Nvidia Grid: Is It The Future Of High Performance Computing? @ eTeknix

AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU Review @ Techspot
Although our news team covered AMD's latest APUs last week, we're a bit behind on the review. The chipmaker couldn't deliver our Kaveri kit until a few days after the official launch date, so we have a case of better late than never. On the bright side, without a hard deadline, we had more time to hit the chip with our full array of benchmarks.

As the successor to last year's Richland APUs, Kaveri has been updated with new CPU cores based on AMD's Steamroller architecture (Richland uses Piledriver cores). The Radeon R7 series GPU has also been integrated, though the 384 SPU version on most Kaveri APUs isn't much different than the A10-6700 and A10-6800's Radeon HD 8670D.


Read more: AMD A8-7600 Kaveri APU Review @ Techspot

Gamer Storm Lucifer Review @ OCC
When using the included fan, cooling performance shows that the Lucifer can run with larger, more expensive coolers. The fan is quiet and can move plenty of air when necessary. And under normal use in passive mode, the Lucifer's large surface area can still handle the load of a stock 4770K, and a lower TDP processor such as the i3 or i5 would likely give even better results. Overclocking simply pushed the temps too high for passive use. And really, you have to have some case fans anyway, so why not just use the 140mm PWM fan that comes with it and thermally speaking, you will be prepared for anything your CPU can dish out.


Read more: Gamer Storm Lucifer Review @ OCC

Sapphire R9 290 4GB TRI-X OC Review @ Hardware Canucks
After months of waiting and some pretty high expectations, custom versions of AMD’s ridiculously popular R9 290-series cards have finally been trickling into the retail channel. Granted, crypto currency miners are snatching them up before most gamers can press the “buy” button, some significant strides have been made towards improved availability. While we’ve already taken an in-depth look at ASUS’ R9 290X DirectCU II OC, in this review we’re going towards a slightly more affordable price point with the Sapphire R9 290 Tri-X OC.

At first glance the R9 290 Tri-X OC may seem like a straightforward custom card with the usual massive heatsink but Sapphire has been keen to point out that a ton of development went into this product. With the Hawaii cores housed within all R9 290 cards outputting a significant amount of heat, designing the Tri-X cooling solution was a challenge. Some of this development cost has carried over into this card’s cost as well considering it currently goes for around $599, making it $100 more expensive than the reference version and exactly the same price as most vanilla R9 290X’s. That’s still a far cry from the custom R9 290X cards though, which frequently hit the $700 mark.


Read more: Sapphire R9 290 4GB TRI-X OC Review @ Hardware Canucks

Asus PQ321Q 4K Monitor Review: Top-Shelf Ultra HD For $3500 @ Toms Hardware
We recently got our hands on Asus? highest-end Ultra HD-capable screen. The PQ321Q offers a native resolution of 3840x2160; and those 8.3 million pixels don?t come cheap. Our real-world and lab testing will tell you if this 4K display is worth $3500.


Read more: Asus PQ321Q 4K Monitor Review: Top-Shelf Ultra HD For $3500 @ Toms Hardware

Tt eSPORTS ConsoleOne Gaming Headset @ KitGuru
While we review a lot of great hardware, sometimes companies drop the ball. Today we look at the Tt eSPORTS ConsoleOne Gaming Headset, and it is quite frankly very disappointing, incorporating the use of cheap plastics. Sadly the price of £67.92 doesn't reflect this.


Read more: Tt eSPORTS ConsoleOne Gaming Headset @ KitGuru




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