NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Reviews Roundup
Posted on: 05/23/2013 04:04 PM

Here a roundup of today's NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 reviews:

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Video Card Review @ Hi Tech Legion
As for tomorrow’s hardware, the GTX TITAN is currently the king of single GPU gaming with a substantial performance lead compared to the current crop of single GPU solutions but also carrying a hefty price tag equivalent to a dual-GPU GTX 690. Just like with previous NVIDIA GeForce releases, the top of the line GTX TITAN demonstrates the maximum potential that an optimized 28nm Kepler architecture is capable of and sets the tone for the rest of the upcoming GTX 700 series.

The GeForce GTX 780 is based on the 7.1 Billion transistor behemoth GK110 GPU used by the GTX TITAN. The GTX 780 delivers a massive 70% performance upgrade compared to the GTX 580, equipped with 2,304 CUDA cores and 3GB of memory across a 384-bit interface. The GeForce GTX 780 also inherits GPU Boost 2.0 from the GTX TITAN, providing superior clock speed boosts through smarter headroom assessment and optimized boost algorithm. The GPU Boost 2.0 works in conjunction with the improved cooling solution that not only runs quieter than the GTX 580 and GTX 680, but also features a new adaptive temperature controller that minimizes fan speed fluctuations for optimal cooling even under heavy load. The reference GTX 780 has a base clock of 863 MHz and a boost clock of 900 MHz with a memory speed of 6.0 Gbps. Similar to the GTX TITAN, the GTX 780 has two SLI connectors, uses 6-pin + 8-pin power connectors and has a TDP of 250W.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Video Card Review @ Hi Tech Legion

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ OCC
Firing up the latest beta version of EVGA's PrecisionX overclocking and tuning utility, I increased the fan speed to the maximum level; this is to provide the best possible cooling scenario as well as looking at the worst noise levels the fan would ever deliver. I then maxed out the voltage and started increasing clock speeds. The first adjustment netted a dynamic boost clock of 1100MHz on the core for a hefty 200MHz boost over the reference boost clock. Further tuning got the boost clock up to 1202MHz, which proved stable through all of the gaming tests. I could run higher clock speeds through some of the games but not all with 3DMark being the primary failure point. Even so that's about a 34% boost in clock speed on the Kepler core. The memory was a lot less forgiving when it came to overclocking, only reaching 1612MHz or about 7%. Every bit helps when you chase benchmark scores.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ OCC

ZOTAC NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Launch Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Today NVIDIA launch the GTX 780 graphics card and we have the ZOTAC branded version on our test bench. We'll be putting it through a selection of real world tests against overclocked 680 and 7970 cards to see how it does in titles like Crysis 3, Metro:Last Light and GRID 2.


ZOTAC NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Launch Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

Nvidia's GeForce GTX 780 graphics card reviewed @ The Tech Report
The first member of the GeForce 700 series promises nearly all of the speed of the GeForce Titan at a much more palatable price. We take a closer look.


Nvidia's GeForce GTX 780 graphics card reviewed @ The Tech Report

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Graphics Card Review - GK110 Mini @ PC Perspective
When NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX Titan in February there was a kind of collective gasp across the enthusiast base. Half of that intake of air was from people amazed at the performance they were seeing on a single GPU graphics cards powered by the GK110 chip. The other half was from people aghast of the $1000 price point that NVIDIA launched it at. The GTX Titan was the fastest single GPU card in the world, without any debate, but with it came a cost we hadn't seen in some time. Even with the debate between it, the GTX 690 and the HD 7990, the Titan was likely my favorite GPU, cost no concerns.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Graphics Card Review - GK110 Mini @ PC Perspective

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ Hardware Canucks
The GeForce GTX 780 may be this year’s most unexpected graphics card. After AMD publically stated the HD 7970 GHz Edition would continue to be their fastest single GPU solution throughout 2013, many expected NVIDIA to maintain the status quo as well. The GTX 680 has continually been in a dominating position within the market while other 600-series cards are well placed to combat AMD’s product stack. Maxwell, with its brand new architecture and a focus on dynamic parallelism is due to launch next year so it only made sense that valuable resources would be directed towards next generation parts. Well that hasn’t happened and the new GTX 700-series is already upon us.

A number of well executed plans allowed for the transition from 600 to 700 series to happen so quickly. The yields of larger Kepler cores like GK110 and GK114 have gradually improved, leading to the possibility of higher end variations of numerous products. NVIDIA also ensured their smaller, more efficient cores were able to compete against AMD’s flagship GPUs, virtually ensuring performance dominance once the larger ASICs were ready for prime time.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ Hardware Canucks

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Graphics Card @ Benchmark Reviews
NVIDIA's GeForce GTX TITAN allowed gamers to challenge any video game they choose with the highest quality settings possible, but in limited supply and high price tag ($1020 Newegg). For many players, their games really only needed half as much power and memory from a video card. Enter NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780: built from GTX TITAN to deliver 3GB of GDDR5 video frame buffer memory, and 2304 CUDA cores from the GK110 GPU that reach 900 MHz using NVIDIA Boost 2.0 technology. In this article, Benchmark Reviews tests and compares the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 graphics card using several highly-demanding DX11 video games, such as Metro: Last Light, Batman: Arkham City, and Battlefield 3.

NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 780 is built using the same GK110 GPU found inside GTX TITAN, along with 3072MB of GDDR5 memory running at the same clock speeds. GTX TITAN delivered 2688 cores clocked at 836/876 boost, which NVIDIA revised to 2304 cores at 863/900 for GeForce GTX 780. Both cards share the same supplementary power connector requirements: 8-pin + 6-pin, as well as the identical 250-watt TDP. Coincidentally, GeForce GTX 780 features twice as many CUDA cores and GDDR5 memory. GeForce GTX 780 has been designed with enough GPU speed and power to outperform the GTX 580 by 70% and GTX 680 by almost 38%.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Graphics Card @ Benchmark Reviews

Nvidia GeForce GTX 780: The Next Step in GeForce @ Bjorn3D
The next step in the evolution of GeForce has arrived. Lets meet the first member of the GTX 700 series: the GeForce GTX 780.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 780

Last year around March we took our first look into the new Kepler based architecture. The GTX 680 was launched to much fanfare from the enthusiast crowd. The launch saw the introduction of several new technologies, and a huge boost in graphics computing power from the 580 series due in part to the introduction of the new Kepler architecture.


Nvidia GeForce GTX 780: The Next Step in GeForce @ Bjorn3D

The Almost Titan: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ Techgage
Around this time every year, a ton of action-packed movies hits the cinema that helps make summer taste just a little bit sweeter. This year, it’s Fast & Furious 6 that’s on my radar. The speed… the fun, the hot women. Actually, that reminds me of something: a new top-end graphics card, much like NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 780, priced at $649.

Is it fast? You bet. Is it fun? Of course. Does it get you hot women? In my limited experience, I can assuredly say that no it does not. But for those lonely nights, there’s gaming, and gaming is better with a top-end graphics card.

You’ll have to excuse me – I’m a bit wired. I’ve been testing the GTX 780 and other select cards for the past week, and as usual, time hasn’t been kind. Mere days prior to receiving NVIDIA’s latest, our 30″ testing monitor perished, meaning our usual 2560×1600 testing was out. That’s a major issue when we’re dealing with ~$500 GPUs.


The Almost Titan: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ Techgage

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ HotHardware.com
When NVIDIA introduced the GeForce GTX Titan a few months back, the company created a huge gap in its single-GPU product line-up. With its GK110 GPU and massive 6GB frame buffer, the GeForce GTX Titan was easily able to outrun the GK104-based GeForce GTX 680 and it hung with the dual-GPU powered GeForce GTX 690 as well. That gap between the GeForce GTX 680 and GTX Titan could have potentially been filled by a scaled down GK110 with a smaller frame buffer, and in fact, one of the first questions we asked of NVIDIA during our briefing on Titan was if a more affordable version of the card was in the works, but company reps were expectedly mum at the time. It’s not like NVIDIA to comment on unannounced products, but we took a shot anyway.

NVIDIA’s talking now, though. Today marks the arrival of the GeForce GTX 780, a graphics card that is essentially a GeForce GTX Titan, with a scaled down GK110 GPU and a smaller, but still relatively large, 3GB complement of video memory. As its name suggest, the new GeForce GTX 780 falls in above the GeForce GTX 680, and below the GTX Titan, but as you’ll see a little later, it’s not all that far behind the Titan overall.

In addition to its latest high-end Graphics card, NVIDIA is also using the occasion to officially launch its GeForce Experience utility announce a new feature to GFE, dubbed ShadowPlay. We’ve got the scoop on the pages ahead...


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Review @ HotHardware.com

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 SLI @ techPowerUp
NVIDIA's new GeForce GTX 780 delivers impressive performance. We put two of them in an SLI configuration to see what you can expect when doubling down on the GTX 780.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 SLI @ techPowerUp

NVIDIA GTX 780 Review @ Vortez
With AMD driver enhancements, the HD7970 had stolen back the performance crown from the GTX 680. That was until the advent of the extraordinary NVIDIA GTX TITAN. The GTX TITAN was however out of many enthusiasts reach because matching that extra ordinary performance was an extra ordinary price. Performance enthusiasts were left with a very difficult choice, save the pennies and look on with envy or go for broke (literally) and stump up the £900 it costs to pay for the TITAN. NVIDIA have never been a company to leave a market untapped though and to plug the gap between the GTX680 and the GTX TITAN we today sample the GTX 780, a new member to the GeForce family.


NVIDIA GTX 780 Review @ Vortez

GeForce GTX 780 Review: The Titan Descendant
The GeForce GTX 680 was Nvidia’s first 28nm part featuring 1536 CUDA cores, 128 texture units and 32 ROP units. It's remained since release Nvidia's fastest single GPU graphics card of the series, second only to the dual-GPU GTX 690 which features a pair of GK104 GPUs.

And so for the last 12+ months the GTX 680 and the Radeon HD 7970 have been battling over the performance crown, forcing numerous price cuts and even a little overclocking from AMD to produce the 7970 GHz Edition. In the end AMD was able to undercut Nvidia on price, producing what we believe to be the better solution.

Most recently however Nvidia showed what they could really do with the GK104 architecture by beefing it up with more CUDA cores, texture units and ROPs creating the GK110. The GeForce GTX Titan is a monster that belongs to an entirely different league, crushing the GeForce GTX 680 as well as the Radeon HD 7970 GHz each and every way possible. Real-world gaming tests saw the GTX Titan outpace the GTX 680 by a 42% margin and the Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition by a 30% margin. In the past we've seen performance jumps of 20 to 25% from one generation to the next, so these numbers are indeed something special.


GeForce GTX 780 Review: The Titan Descendant

Gigabyte GTX 780 WindForce OC 3 GB @ techPowerUp
Gigabyte's GTX 780 WindForce OC introduces a brand-new triple slot cooler design that uses improved heatpipe technology. Thanks a large overclock out of the box and clever thermal engineering, the cards ends up faster than GeForce GTX Titan.


Gigabyte GTX 780 WindForce OC 3 GB @ techPowerUp

Nvidia GTX 780 @ LanOC Reviews
It almost feels like we have been seeing the 600 series of cards from Nvidia for a few years now. At a year and two months we are a little past due to see a new generation of cards and today we can finally take the wraps off of NVidia’s latest card, the GTX 780. Rumors have been going around for a while on this launch so let’s just jump right into it and see what it’s all about and then how it performs. One thing is for sure, this will be the start of a lot of exciting cards, and 2013 is going to be a good year!


Nvidia GTX 780 @ LanOC Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3 GB @ techPowerUp
Today, NVIDIA released their new GeForce GTX 780, which is based on the GK110 GPU - just like the GTX Titan. The new card not only inherits the fantastic looks of the Titan, but is also very close to it in overall performance. NVIDIA's pricing is certainly not cheap at $649.


NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3 GB @ techPowerUp

Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 Review: Titan's Baby Brother Is Born @ Tom's Hardware
At $1,000, GeForce GTX Titan only made sense for folks building small form factor PCs and multi-GPU powerhouses. Now there's another option with every bit of panache, a slightly de-tuned GPU, and a price tag $350 lower: meet Nvidia's GeForce GTX 780.


Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 Review: Titan's Baby Brother Is Born @ Tom's Hardware




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