NVIDIA Geforce GTX 750 Ti and more
Posted on: 02/19/2014 12:15 PM

Here a roundup of today's NVIDIA graphics cards reviews:

ASUS GTX 750 OC 1 GB
EVGA GTX 750Ti FTW ACX previewed
GeForce GTX 750 Ti Review: Maxwell Adds Performance Using Less Power
Geforce GTX 750Ti Launch Review
MSI GTX 750 Ti Gaming 2 GB
MSI GTX 750 Ti Gaming Video Card Review
MSI GTX 750 Ti Twin Frozr Gaming Review
MSI GTX750Ti OC Twin Frozr Review
MSI Z87 XPower Review
Multiple GeForce GTX 750 / 750 Ti reviews
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti (28nm Maxwell)
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2 GB
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card Review
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Benchmark Performance
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell GPU Review
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell On Linux
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti Review
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti vs. AMD Radeon R7 265
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750Ti the Arrival of Maxwell
Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Black 4-way SLI review
Nvidia GTX 750 Ti
NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti Maxwell Review
NVIDIA GTX 750Ti & MSI GTX 750 Gaming Review
Palit GTX 750 Ti StormX Dual 2 GB
The GTX 750 Ti Review; Maxwell Arrives
The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 Review: Maxwell Makes Its Move

ASUS GTX 750 OC 1 GB
Today NVIDIA also launched the GeForce GTX 750, which is similar to the GTX 750 Ti, just with fewer shaders and lower clocks. The ASUS GTX 750 OC is overclocked out of the box to provide some extra performance, while still being power efficient, cool and quiet.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

EVGA GTX 750Ti FTW ACX previewed
The GTX 750 Ti is finally here and it is the first Nvidia graphics card based on Maxwell, the new power efficiency oriented generation graphics architecture. Today we will be taking a quick look at the EVGA GTX 750 Ti FTW ACX. The Geforce GTX 750 Ti will sell for $149 and will compete with the Radeon HD R7 265. The EVGA card comes with a factory overclock and a custom cooler and these extras will cost you a 20$ premium. For the Eurorozne the MSRP for the 750 Ti FTW card is €159.99.

We got the card packed in a nice small package, that tells us this card features Nvidia G-Sync technology and comes with 2GB GDDR5 memory. EVGA's global warranty is three years on all graphics cards which have the -KR suffix in their product code. The product code for the 750 Ti FTW ACX is P/N 02G-P4-3767-KR.


Read full article @ Fudzilla

GeForce GTX 750 Ti Review: Maxwell Adds Performance Using Less Power
Now that Nvidia is designing graphics architectures with Tegra in mind, first and foremost, efficiency takes priority. Can the company's mainstream GeForce GTX 750 Ti, based on its Maxwell architecture, prove that an eye on energy trumps the old approach?


Read full article @ Toms Hardware

Geforce GTX 750Ti Launch Review
It has been some time since NVIDIA has released a "new" GPU. That changes today with the launch of the GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti, both based on the Maxwell core. We have an overclocked version of the Ti on our test bench today and will throw some of the latest games at it, including Battlefield 4, DOTA 2 and Assassins Creed 4: Black Flag.


Read full article @ HardwareHeaven

MSI GTX 750 Ti Gaming 2 GB
MSI's GTX 750 Ti Gaming is the quietest GTX 750 Ti that we reviewed today. It is whisper quiet in both idle and during gaming, even with the included overclock out of the box. Thanks to NVIDIA's Maxwell architecture the card also runs very cool and needs little power.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

MSI GTX 750 Ti Gaming Video Card Review
I don’t understand fanboys. I never have, I never will. I do admit to being a fanboy of certain things, but those things are not brand related, they are quality and performance related. For example, I like my cases to be very sturdy, easy to work on, well designed to make good use of space, have good airflow and minimalistic styling. There are certain manufacturers that happen to do this better than others, and I do recommend them and am more apt to use certain pieces in their lines. That decision is based on the quality of the component, not on the brand name on the piece. If you give me a case that meets these requirements better than what I have, I don’t care who makes it, I will say that it is the better piece. For some, however, when it comes to GPUs, the entire idea of advocating the better GPU goes out the window. We see far more justifying of shortcomings than we do acknowledging the better piece.


Read full article @ HiTech Legion

MSI GTX 750 Ti Twin Frozr Gaming Review
Today's launch of Nvidia's Maxwell products sees the GTX 750 Ti looking to take over the budget range for Team Green. Promising better energy efficiency and lower power consumption, MSI's GTX 750 Ti Twin Frozr Gaming is a boon to anyone considering an HTPC, or even better, a small form box that can pull double duty as a media box and still handle moderate gaming
without being reduced to a slideshow for framerates. This card looks very promising on paper. And MSI looks to have put quite a bit of tech into the budget-oriented card, so let's take a closer look and get it on the bench to see if real world tests can fulfill Nvidia's aspirations.


Read full article @ PureOverclock

MSI GTX750Ti OC Twin Frozr Review
Last week AMD released their new R7 265 graphics card, and KitGuru was on hand to review (http://www.kitguru.net/components/graphic-cards/zardon/sapphire-r7-265-dual-x-graphics-card-review/) the custom cooled Sapphire version. AMD tweaked their old HD7850 design and dropped the price to £100 in an attempt to dominate the market. Today we are looking at Nvidia’s new budget grade enthusiast gaming card, the GTX 750 Ti.


Read full article @ KitGuru

MSI Z87 XPower Review
The Z87 XPower is MSI's flagship offer when it comes to Z87 Express based motherboards. This board not only features a massive 32 phase digital power design but also lots of additional overclocking features, beefed-up audio as well as a Killer network chip. Other than that MSI provided this board with their unique and good looking color scheme, where basically almost anything is black apart from a few yellow spots.


Read full article @ ocaholic

Multiple GeForce GTX 750 / 750 Ti reviews
In today's article we review the new GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti from Nvidia. These cards are affordable - low power - decent performance graphics cards that will allow you to game even at 1080P. These cards are intended to replace the Geforce GTX 650 series. For the technology-press however the most important fact is that a new GPU architecture was applied, these cards based on the new Maxwell GPU architecture.

That's right, Maxwell, as Nvidia is now slowly moving away from Kepler. The first Maxwell GPU released is the GM107, which has been baked and plastered onto the GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti graphics cards. Maxwell makes use of a 28nm node manufacturing process, later models however should move down to a 20nm manufacturing process. Nvidia launches two initial products today, the GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti. Both hover on the entry-level to mainstream level segment. As such, the GeForce GTX 750 Ti will get 640 CUDA cores, 40 TMUs and 16 ROPs. These cards will be equipped with 1 or 2GB GDDR5 memory bound over a rather narrow 128-bit interface. In terms of clock frequencies, depending on brand/oem 1020 MHz will be the baseline target for the main clock frequency on the GPU while the cards can boost to 1084 MHz. The 'standard' GeForce GTX 750 will get 512 CUDA cores, 32 TMUs and 16 ROPs, with just 1GB graphics memory though.

Overall, the GeForce GTX 750 and 750 Ti, as we'll demonstrate, will have enough horsepower to step into the DX11 gaming arena at up-to 1920x1080 (Full HD) resolution as Maxwell does bring in some new efficiencies. Now that doesn't mean that all modern titles will be playable with good image quality settings, let's just say that dated titles will be playable with a resolution of 1920x1080/1200. And if you can forfeit to medium quality settings in a game and don't do any crazy stuff anti-aliasing wise, it's definitely plausible to play games really nicely at FullHD with acceptable framerates. The GeForce GTX 750 (Ti) graphics cards will be launched in the sub 150 USD/EUR price range. In this review we'll look at the models from NVIDIA themselves, thus the reference products.


Read full article @ Guru3D

Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti (28nm Maxwell)
A brand-new architecture for the mainstream. Nvidia is today launching the GeForce GTX 750 Ti. This all-new GPU is designed to provide decent gaming performance at a 1080p (1,920x1,080) resolution whilst also focusing on energy efficiency in the process. Priced from $149 from the usual bevy of partners, let's roll out the Table of Doom™ and take a high-level overview of what makes it tick.


Read full article @ Hexus

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2 GB
Today NVIDIA launched their GeForce GTX 750 Ti, which is based on the new GM107 graphics processor, introducing NVIDIA's Maxwell graphics architecture. Power consumption of the new card is at a record low, which means temperature and noise levels are impressive as well.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB Video Card Review
NVIDIA today announced the new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 video cards, which are very interesting to use as they are the first cards based on NVIDIA's new Maxwell graphics architecture. NVIDIA has been developing Maxwell for a number of years and have decided to launch entry-level discrete graphics cards with the new technology first in the $119 to $149 price range. NVIDIA heavily focused on performance per watt with Maxwell and it clearly shows as the GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB video card measures just 5.7-inches in length with a tiny heatsink and doesn't require any internal power connectors!


Read full article @ Legit Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Benchmark Performance
The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti graphics card is designed for mainstream 1080p gaming with moderate settings. GeForce GTX 750 Ti utilizes first-generation NVIDIA Maxwell GM107 GPU architecture with 640 CUDA Cores. The memory subsystem of GeForce GTX 750 Ti consists of two 64-bit memory controllers (128-bit total bandwidth) and 2GB of 5.4Gbps GDDR5 memory. GeForce GTX 750 Ti’s base clock speed is 1020MHz, and features a typical Boost Clock speed reaching 1085MHz. In this article, Benchmark Reviews tests the GeForce GTX 750 Ti graphics card using several highly-demanding DX11 video games, such as Metro: Last Light, Batman: Arkham City, and Battlefield 3.


Read full article @ Benchmark Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell GPU Review
The mid-range graphics card market has seen a lot of action as of late, with an infusion of new products and the discontinuation of popular previous-gen products. Last week it was AMD's turn to announce a new card-the $150 Radeon R7 265-and with its arrival also came a price cut on the Radeon R7 260X, which can now be had for as low as $129, though the MSRP has technically been reduced to $119.

Today is NVIDIA's turn to introduce a new mid-range graphics card. But unlike AMD's re-brand and soft-launch, NVIDIA is at the ready with a brand-new GPU architecture and cards should be hitting store shelves immediately. The new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GeForce GTX 750 are the first graphics cards in NVIDIA's line-up to feature the company's next-gen Maxwell GPU architecture, which is an evolution of Kepler that's designed to for higher performance and power efficiency...


Read full article @ HotHardware.com

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell On Linux
This morning NVIDIA is unveiling their "Maxwell" family of graphics processors that succeed Kepler. With some past generations of NVIDIA hardware we have had to wait a while as Linux users to see how they would work and perform under non-Windows platforms, but I can tell you this morning that the brand new GeForce GTX 750 Ti is already running great on Linux and is delivering terrific results as a sub-$200 mid-range NVIDIA graphics card. Here's the first Ubuntu Linux review of the GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell graphics card.

The NDA has just expired on NVIDIA's Maxwell so I can tell you now that at Phoronix we have already been analyzing and testing the GeForce GTX 750 Ti Maxwell for the past week. The Maxwell GPUs will eventually assemble the GeForce 800 series but the hardware that NVIDIA is announcing this morning is the GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti graphics cards. The GeForce GTX 750 is launching at a price of only $119 USD while the GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB is hard launching today at a price of $149 USD. (There will also be a GTX 750 Ti 1GB variant that's launching later this month at the competitive price of $139, but I would likely recommend just spending $10 more to get twice the video RAM capacity.) The GeForce GTX 750 Ti is targeting the mid-range segment of gamers, especially those that are cost conscious and may be depending upon an OEM PC that doesn't have a large PSU or any PCI-E power connectors, which is fine since this graphics card is incredibly power efficient. The GTX 750 Ti also opens up new possibilities for mini ITX systems with being so power efficient and the graphics card able to fit within these very small form factor enclosures.


Read full article @ Phoronix

Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti Review
Nvidia and AMD have been waging a graphics war that's getting bloodier than ever, thanks to the release of Nvidia's 700-series and AMD's R7 and R9-series video cards.The green team's newest edition to the market is the 750 Ti, which provides gamers with an inexpensive 1080p gaming video card.Nvidia's small-sized 750 Ti runs only $149, half the price of the GTX 760, and just $20 more than AMD's R7 260X, if you account for the 260X's recent price cut.While the 260X is a rebadged Radeon HD 7790, Nvidia's 750 Ti features a brand new GPU architecture called Maxwell.In the past Nvidia has released new architectures from the top down, meaning they would typically release a high-end video card like the Titan and then slowly release lower-end GPUs with the new architecture.It's definitely a savvy move for Nvidia to refresh their low-end offerings first; at $150 the 750 Ti is an impulse buy compared to upcoming Maxwell refreshed Titan Black.Like other 700-Series cards, the 750 Ti supports G-Sync, a new technology from Nvidia that allows GeForce video cards to play games without refresh rate induced stutter or screen tearing.


Read full article @ Techradar

Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 Ti vs. AMD Radeon R7 265
Marking the introduction of its Maxwell architecture, Nvidia has targeted AMD's $150 Radeon R7 265 with the new GeForce GTX 750 Ti, a card that promises to be more than another rebadge. The GTX 750 Ti's GM107 is meant to make Nvidia's 28nm design process as efficient as possible by splitting Kepler's 192-core streaming multiprocessor (SM) into four blocks with each block featuring its own control logic.

This is said to boost core utilization and allows Maxwell to do more with less. According to Nvidia's numbers, Maxwell increases the amount of peak performance per core by 35% compared to those in chips built on the previous-generation Kepler architecture. With fewer cores being used to get more performance, Maxwell naturally consumes less power and improves Kepler's performance per watt.

Maxwell brings other improvements as well, but that boost alone suggests that AMD's Radeon R7 265 could be in trouble at today's pricing considering it's essentially a slightly overclocked and steeply discounted HD 7850. However, we can't forget that it hasn't even been two years since the HD 7850 was the best mainstream value going, so we have high hopes for the R7 265 at its reduced price point.


Read full article @ Techspot

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750Ti the Arrival of Maxwell
In days of old, when men were bold and GPUs weren’t invented, they took a box and put a hand in a sock to keep the masses contented. It’s been a long time since people entertained themselves by going to see a marionette show at the local theater. Marionettes were later replaced by plays, which were replaced by film projectors and, in the present day, a disc in a computer, which requires a GPU to render the image. Where would we be today without the technologies we have grown accustomed to and take for granted? Still gathering in front of the radio to listen to Lawrence Welk or maybe watching a black and white 12” TV that has no sound? Video has become a part of everyone's daily life and as new technology emerges, the need for more powerful rendering has driven the industry farther in four years than the last eight combined.


Read full article @ HiTech Legion

Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Black 4-way SLI review
Tuesday, February 18th 2014 marks not just the introduction of Nvidia's GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750; the brand also introduces a new top model, the GeForce GTX Titan Black. While Nvidia did not provide us with samples of this new premium graphics card, our heroes at Tones.be helped us out so we could test Nvidia's new top of the line model.True to form, our Belgian friends delivered the equivalent of about 4000 euros worth of graphics card in our lab, so we could test not just a single card, but also SLI, triple- and quad-SLI configurations.

We can consider the original Titan's story known. Nvidia introduced the GeForce GTX Titan early March 2013, based on the first and most powerful chip of the Kepler generation, the GK110. The Titan was aimed both at consumers and professional users and it broke pretty much every record in existence, thanks to its 2688 Cuda cores, 6 gigabytes of memory and 384-bit bus. Of course this performance came at a price, of around 1000 euros. As such, it was only an option for the most privileged of gamers, and overclockers well-endowed with sponsors. In addition, the group that the Titan proved really popular with was the one using the graphics card for professional Cuda applications: the GTX Titan offered the same unrestricted double-precision floating point performance as Nvidia's much more expensive Tesla cards.


Read full article @ Hardware.Info

Nvidia GTX 750 Ti
It’s hard to believe that Nvidia’s Kepler architecture has been around for nearly two years now. In those two years Nvidia has continued to innovate with Kepler exclusive features like Shadowplay and PC streaming to your Nvidia Shield. Well now it is finally time to take a look at what Nvidia has been working on with its latest architecture, Maxwell. Interestingly enough Nvidia isn’t launching their new architecture with a flagship card, they chose to fill in a gap in their current 700 series of cards down at budget price points. Today they are introducing the GTX 750 Ti and the GTX 750 and I will be putting a GTX 750 Ti through its paces as well.


Read full article @ LanOC Reviews

NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti Maxwell Review
It was early 2012 that we saw the introduction of Kepler architecture so 2 years on it should come as no surprise that NVIDIA are about to unleash the latest range of GeForce graphics cards to feature the new architecture codenamed 'Maxwell'. While there is still progress being made with Kepler, most recently with the fantastic GTX 780 Ti, demand for next generation technology is high. Maxwell looks build upon the success of the 2 year old architecture, particularly with regard to power consumption.

We had massive leaps in performance with Kepler and while it wasn't exactly an inefficient core, there were clearly improvements to be had so this time around NVIDIA are looking to make a more efficient architecture with Maxwell, at least until the second generation Maxwell cards appear which will no doubt raise the performance threshold once more. The first example of the new Maxwell Core GM107 comes in the guise of the GeForce GTX 750 Ti. The GM107 is designed for power limited environments such as SFF PCs and notebooks. Efficiency however is clearly coupled with power because NVIDIA claim the GTX 750 Ti will frequently match the GTX 480. Not a bad show if those claims are found to be true!


Read full article @ Vortez

NVIDIA GTX 750Ti & MSI GTX 750 Gaming Review
This launch brings us a new architecture from NVIDIA code named Maxwell. Why start at the low end of the spectrum instead of dropping a bomb with a high end card that is going to deliver even more in terms of performance than what two of the highest performing cards on the market (the GTX 780 Ti and GTX Titan) are delivering right now? Because the mainstream market is populated with PCs running integrated graphics that can see huge gaming performance improvements with a discrete video card that requires nothing more of the end user than to purchase the card and install it.

Wait, don't you need a new power supply when putting in a discrete video card? Not with this implementation of Maxwell or GM107. The goal was to target this burgeoning market of PCs with a power efficient card that can run all of the current games at 1080p, but do it in a low power envelope on a reduced form factor video card. That means that yes, Johnny, you can keep that 300 watt power supply that came in your PC and not have to increase your spending to get a 10x boost in gaming performance. It's a win-win for that consumer base, really. NVIDIA learned a lot when it was working on its Tegra program and integrated some of the power management learnings into Maxwell.


Read full article @ OCC

Palit GTX 750 Ti StormX Dual 2 GB
Palit's new GTX 750 Ti StormX Dual comes with the fantastic power consumption improvements of the Maxwell architecture but also includes a large overclock out of the box. Additional overclocking potential is also excellent, making this the card you want if you are after maximized performance.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

The GTX 750 Ti Review; Maxwell Arrives
NVIDIA’s Kepler architecture has been around for some time now. While it may be hard to believe, we were introduced to Kepler in GTX 680 guise back in March of 2012 which means it’s nearly two years old now. There have been some revisions since then, allowing the architecture to deliver better performance per watt and better compete against AMD’s alternatives. Now the time has come to unveil their next generation DX11 architecture, code named Maxwell.

Unlike previous launches, Maxwell isn’t being rolled out into the high end market but will initially target volume sales within the $99 to $149 price points via a new 1.87 billion transistor GM107 core. This focus on budget minded gamers may sound like an odd decision on NVIDIA’s part but they feel the current flagship GeForce parts compete well against AMD’s product stack (and they do) so there’s more than enough time to fine-tune Maxwell for other applications. Make no mistake about it though, GM107 is simply a pipe-cleaner part that is meant to test a new architecture and prepare the way for higher end products in the near future.

Contrary to AMD’s scattershot approach by flooding the mid-range with a deluge of different, closely priced cards like the R7 260X, R7 265 and R9 270, NVIDIA is taking a more measured approach. The GM107 will be first rolled into two different SKUs: the GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750.


Read full article @ Hardware Canucks

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 Review: Maxwell Makes Its Move
As the GPU company whos arguably more transparent about their long-term product plans, NVIDIA still manages to surprise us time and time again. Case in point, we have known since 2012 thatNVIDIAs follow-up architecture to Kepler would be Maxwell, but its only more recently that weve begun to understand the complete significance of Maxwell to the companys plans. Each and every generation of GPUs brings with it an important mix of improvements, new features, and enhanced performance; but fundamental shifts are fewer and far between. So when we found out Maxwell would be one of those fundamental shifts, it changed our perspective and expectations significantly. Read on for our review of Maxwell, NVIDIA's next major GPU technology and the first card it'll be found in: the GeForce GTX 750.


Read full article @ Anandtech




Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/nvidia_geforce_gtx_750_ti_and_more.html)