NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost Reviews Roundup
Posted on: 03/26/2013 03:32 PM

Here a roundup of today's NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost Review @ OCC
Using a Kepler core at its heart, the GTX 650Ti Boost edition overclocks much like any of the enthusiast cards such as the GTX 680 and GTX Titan. For this exercise I will be using EVGA Precision to overclock the GTX 650Ti Boost. Knowing where these cores normally start to show signs of instability, I moved the sliders up to a point where I was running a core boost clock of almost 1200MHz as my starting point. The maximum fan speed I could set was 74%, yet this kept the core at a modest 56 °C under load. A higher fan speed may have dropped the load temperatures but most certainly increased the noise signature from the card. The voltage used in Precision was set to 1150mv after failing to complete the stability testing phase of the overclock testing. Final settings were 1215MHz under boost on the core with a 1603MHz clock on the GDDR5 memory.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost Review @ OCC

NVIDIA and EVGA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Video Card Review @ Legit Reviews
The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti 1GB video card launched in October 2012 with a $149 suggested retail price. Here we are just five months later and we have the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST 1GB for $149. The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST is a far better gaming graphics card at this price point and it just goes to show power of eliminating the memory bottleneck and the higher clocks speeds of NVIDIA GPU Boost technology. Owners of the original GeForce GTX 650 Ti video card won't be happy when they read this, but if you've been waiting for something sweet to come out in the $150-$170 price range, you should have finally found it...


Read more: NVIDIA and EVGA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Video Card Review @ Legit Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Review @ HotHardware
In the final analysis of our AMD Radeon HD 7790 review, which launched last week, we mentioned that the mainstream GPU landscape would likely change again by the time the 7790 was actually available on store shelves. Although we posted a full review of the card on March 22, they aren't slated to go on sale until April 2.

Today we're making it clear why we made that statement about the changing GPU landscape. To counter the just-announced Radeon HD 7790, NVIDIA is already launching a new card of its own, which is somewhat of a cross between the GeForce GTX 650 Ti and GeForce GTX 660. The new GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST that we'll be showing you here today takes the CUDA core and texture unit configuration of the GTX 650 Ti and the memory controller and ROP configuration of the GTX 660 and melds them together on a new product that drops in right between the two in NVIDIA's current GPU lineup.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Review @ HotHardware

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Review @ Vortez
In our recent evaluation of the AMD Radeon HD7790, we saw it take the entry level crown away from the NVIDIA GTX650Ti. We suspected that NVIDIA has an answer waiting in the wings and that has been borne true with today's release of the NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti BOOST. The keyword being BOOST as the GTX650Ti has undergone a refresh to combat the new threat poised by AMD. When we reviewed the original GTX650Ti were were impressed with the FPS that the little card churned out however we were left wanting because for the most part, gaming at today's most popular resolution of 1920x1080 proved troublesome. NVIDIA admitted this in the media press pack for the new release so hopefully, we will not see a repeat performance today as the AMD HD7790 has proven that you don't need to spend a fortune to play games at 1920x1080 to a playable FPS level.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST Review @ Vortez

Palit GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Overclock Edition Graphics Card Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Today though NVIDIA is looking to fill a bit of a gap in the middle of their product stack with a new model, the GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost and on our test bench we have an overclocked model. Well be putting it through a selection of the latest games, including Crysis 3, Tomb Raider and StarCraft 2: Heart of the Swarm


Read more: Palit GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Overclock Edition Graphics Card Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST 2GB Graphics Card Review - Revised GK106 @ PC Perspective
In mid-October NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 650 Ti based on GK106, the same GPU that powers the GTX 660 though with fewer enabled CUDA cores and GPC units. At the time we were pretty impressed with the 650 Ti:

The GTX 650 Ti has more in common with the GTX 660 than it does the GTX 650, both being based on the GK106 GPU, but is missing some of the unique features that NVIDIA has touted of the 600-series cards like GPU Boost and SLI.

Today's release of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST actually addresses both of those missing features by moving even closer to the specification sheet found on the GTX 660 cards.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST 2GB Graphics Card Review - Revised GK106 @ PC Perspective

Nvidia's GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost graphics card reviewed @ The Tech Report
Mere days after the release of the Radeon HD 7790, Nvidia has raised the curtain on a new mid-range offering of its own: the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost. We've taken a closer look at this new card, which should be available later today for $169.


Read more: Nvidia's GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost graphics card reviewed @ The Tech Report

GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Graphics Card reference review @ Guru3D
It never sits well with NVIDIA when the competition releases a product that sits close to modern game mainstream performance and fills an apparent small gap that has not been addressed just yet. Hence NVIDIA today releases the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost edition. It is their answer to the Radeon HD 7790 that AMD unleashed recently. Is entry level finally reaching mid-range? Can the card play your most favorite games at 1920x1080/1200 ? Well yes it does, the GeForce GTX 650 Ti deserves some explanation though, as the entire 650 range itself now is getting a little flooded with products that differ quite a bit from each other.

See when you take the regular GeForce GTX 650 it comes castrated a bit with just 384 shader cores whereas the regular Ti model is released with a far better 768 CUDA cores (shader processors) and a 925 MHz GPU clock (for the reference products). So that's already nearly double the processing performance and allows the product to compete with the Radeon HD 7770. With the Radeon HD 7790 being roughly a third faster than 7770, NVIDIA needed to out a product that can keep up with that rather significant performance boost -- and as such the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost edition now is introduced. So budget graphics card series for gamers therefore just got a little more interesting. Albeit we say that 169 USD/EUR should not exactly really carry the mark of being low budget.

With that price tag the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost positions itself smack-down in-between AMD's Radeon HD 7790 and 7850, and that really is a comfortable spot to be in for many of you as Full HD gaming (a monitor resolution of 1920x1080) is now becoming a viable option. Obviously NVIDIA did not want to make yet another separate chip. So The GTX 650 Ti Boost is the very same one used on the regular GTX 660, yup the GTX 650 Ti Boost is using the "GF106" silicon opposed to the GK107 being used on the regular 650 model (it's confusing as heck we know). The GK106 silicon is armed with 768 active shader processor cores divided over four processor clusters running at a 980 MHz base clock on the reference products. That means that the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost packs decent enough punch. There is a distinct difference though, Boost or better yet, dynamics clocking has been added to this model.


Read more: GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Graphics Card reference review @ Guru3D

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2 GB @ techPowerUp
Today NVIDIA launches their new GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost, which offers a large performance increase thanks to the added Boost algorithm and wider bus interface. With a price of only $169 it is the new price/performance king in the sub-$200 segment.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost 2 GB @ techPowerUp

NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Review @ Hardware Canucks
NVIDIA’s GTX 650 Ti and GTX 660 may be popular graphics cards in their own respective markets; there is a significant performance and price difference between them. The new GTX 650 Ti Boost may have a mouthful of a name but, like AMD’s own HD 7790, it is meant to plug one of the most obvious gaps within the GeForce lineup with a card that can offer high framerates at 1080P without costing more than $175. Somewhat ironically, this is exactly what AMD’s newest card sets out to accomplish but NVIDIA’s approach is very different. We hinted at a green team broadside in the HD 7790 review and this is it.

Instead of neatly slotting the GTX 650 Boost into a convenient position without modifying their current lineup’s pricing structure, NVIDIA will be shuffling things around a bit. The GTX 650 Ti Boost will start at $169 for the 2GB version and $149 for an upcoming 1GB lSKU. Naturally, this necessitates some movement for the GTX 650 Ti which is being lowered to a mere $129 and the GTX 650 goes to $109 while even the GTX 660 2GB has moved to a new $199 level.


Read more: NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti Boost 2GB Review @ Hardware Canucks

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST @ Benchmark Reviews
With the economy on the rebound, gamers are coming out of hibernation with a hunger for modern DirectX11 graphics and realism. Since AMD has all but disappeared from the scene, NVIDIA has timed their affordable mainstream video card launch perfectly. Based on the NVIDIA Kepler GK106 architecture, the GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST delivers 2GB of 1502 MHz GDDR5 memory and 768 CUDA Cores operating at 980 MHz up to 1033+ with NVIDIA GPU Boost technology. In this article, Benchmark Reviews tests the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST graphics card using several highly-demanding DX11 video games.

By tradition, NVIDIA's GeForce GTX series offers enthusiast-level performance with features like multi-card SLI pairing. More recently, the GTX family has included GPU Boost application-driven variable overclocking technology. The GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST graphics card keeps with tradition in terms of performance by offering the capable GK106 GPU with 768 CUDA cores clocked to 980 MHz with 2GB of GDDR5 vRAM. Later next month the GTX 650 Ti BOOST will become available in a less-expensive ($150) 1GB GDDR5 version. Of course, NVIDIA's Kepler GPU architecture adds proprietary features to both versions, such as: 3D Vision, Adaptive Vertical Sync, multi-display Surround, PhysX, and TXAA antialiasing.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST @ Benchmark Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Video Card Review @ HardOCP
It's a busy week for gamers looking at new video card options in the $150 price range. It’s been only four days since the competition launched its new AMD Radeon HD 7790 video card with an MSRP of $149 for 1GB models. This video card boosted AMD’s performance at $150 by 30% in games compared to the prior Radeon HD 7770.

We evaluated the new Radeon HD 7790 using a retail ASUS Radeon HD 7790 DirectCU II OC video card, which had a slight out-of-box overclock. We found the new Radeon HD 7790 to be a capable video card of finally matching, and even besting in some games, the performance of NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 650 Ti. The GeForce GTX 650 Ti was already sitting at a higher performance profile than the Radeon HD 7770, and the HD7790 brought AMD up to that level finally. However, we mentioned in the conclusion that the Radeon HD 7790 was riding the fence on performance. It wouldn’t take much from NVIDIA to swing the gate back to their favor.

We gave the Radeon HD 7790 a HardOCP Enthusiast Silver award for bringing performance from AMD up to the competition, and providing a solid gameplay experience in today’s games. What we have to show you today, supersedes the Radeon HD 7790 for sure, in several ways. Today, NVIDIA’s new GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost is the second video card to raise the bar at the $150 price segment, and it’s raising it much higher than the Radeon HD 7790 did.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Video Card Review @ HardOCP

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Review: Bringing Balance To The Force @ Anandtech
Launching today is NVIDIA's answer to AMD's Radeon HD 7790 and 7850, the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost. The GTX 650 Ti Boost is based on the same GK106 GPU as the GTX 650 Ti and GTX 660, and is essentially a filler card to bridge the gap between them. By adding GPU boost back into the mix and using a slightly more powerful core configuration, NVIDIA intends to plug their own performance gap and at the same time counter AMD's 7850 and 7790 before the latter even reaches retail.


Read more: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost Review: Bringing Balance To The Force @ Anandtech




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