Micron P420m 1.4TB PCIe SSD Review and more
Posted on: 09/09/2013 12:21 PM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles, including Micron P420m 1.4TB PCIe SSD Review, Cooler Master V-series 850W Power Supply Review, MESH Elite G4 760SLi Review, Gainward GTX 760 Phantom 2GB Graphics Card Review, and Next-Generation AMD Radeon Series Nomenclature Detailed

Micron P420m 1.4TB PCIe SSD Review @ KitGuru
The Micron P420m, announced earlier this summer, is a half-height, half-length (HHHL) PCIe storage device that augments Micron's PCIe enterprise storage line. The P420m has a lot to live up to. If you remember back to last October, we reviewed the Micron P320h and came away thoroughly impressed. Massive amounts of speed, endurance and parallelism were at our disposal. With the P420m, Micron is at it again, but this time they brought MLC NAND to the table instead of the bulletproof SLC NAND they used in the P320h.


Read more: Micron P420m 1.4TB PCIe SSD Review @ KitGuru

be quiet! PowerZone 650W PSU Review @ KitGuru
Today we are looking at the new be quiet! PowerZone 650W power supply. These new units are set to target discerning gamers and PC enthusiasts and incorporate a fully modular design, low noise fans and 80 Plus Bronze certification. Is the PowerZone 650W worth shortlisting?


Read more: be quiet! PowerZone 650W PSU Review @ KitGuru

Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB SSD Review @ OCIA.net
As most PC enthusiasts know, the right choice of storage media - particularly for the operating system - can make or break the entire build. Earlier this year we reviewed the Vector and Vertex 3.20, two of OCZ's latest SSD offerings and judging by the Kingston data sheet their HyperX 3K looks to bring an equal challenge to the table. Touting 555MB/s sequential reads and 510MB/s writes, the HyperX 3K 240GB SSD offers impressive performance courtesy of the Sandforce 2 controller... all with a three year warranty.


Read more: Kingston HyperX 3K 240GB SSD Review @ OCIA.net

be quiet Pure Power L8 700W @ PureOverclock
The be quiet brand name may not be very well known in North America, but in the European market it’s a different story. With an established reputation in the power supply market, the company is looking to expand further west, and from what we’ve seen so far with their products, they appear to be on the right track.

We came away very impressed by the be quiet Dark Power Pro model after our testing, and today we’re focusing on a power supply that’s a bit more modest in its goals but also in its price. The Pure Power L8 700W is a more budget-oriented unit that looks to be more affordable to the masses without compromising quality. Coming with an 80PLUS Bronze rating at a price of $100, we think be quiet is certainly making the right moves for its North American target audience.


Read more: be quiet Pure Power L8 700W @ PureOverclock

Cooler Master V-series 850W Power Supply Review @ HiTech Legion
I admit it, sometimes I get completely drawn into infomercials. Yes, I realize how ridiculous that sounds, and it isn’t because I would ever actually buy anything from one. There is just a morbid curiosity of what the claims will be. Will the food dehydrator “even work in outer space”? Can the utility knife “cut through a twelve story building and still cut tomatoes paper thin”? Can the jewelry cleaner really “dissolve any residue on metal while remaining absolutely delicious”? What will the next claim be?

But, that’s the thing, these physically impossible claims that are also impossible to disprove due to sly wording make the product seem more appealing. Just like the chant of “but….wait, there’s more!” adds perceived value. Some of these products set ludicrous goals in their advertising, and somehow there are people who are surprised that drinking acai juice didn’t allow them to breathe underwater. There are times we see claims that are pretty astounding, but the standards they set for the product we well know may be true.


Read more: Cooler Master V-series 850W Power Supply Review @ HiTech Legion

Tesoro Colada Mechanical Keyboard @ Rbmods
Tesoro is getting bigger as we speak and they are close to releasing a new mechanical keyboard while at the same time expanding their empire. We got a closer look at their Colada keyboard that we are going to try out today. It comes with a brushed steel chassis and some cherry MX black switches… so lets take a closer look.


Read more: Tesoro Colada Mechanical Keyboard @ Rbmods

MESH Elite G4 760SLi Review @ KitGuru
With the launch of Nvidia's new range of high end graphic cards well under way it is time for the Santa Clara engineering team to turn its attention to the more affordable end of the market. Each generation has its 'people's champion' and Jen Hsun Huang will surely be hoping that the GTX760 can be that card for 2013. The MESH brand has been around since 1987 and when we asked them for a powerful, affordable GTX760 SLi system for analysis, they happily obliged.


Read more: MESH Elite G4 760SLi Review @ KitGuru

Gainward GTX 760 Phantom 2GB Graphics Card Review @ Kitguru
With the launch of Nvidia's new range of high end graphic cards well under way it is time for the Santa Clara engineering team to turn its attention to the more affordable end of the market. Each generation has its 'people's champion' and Jen Hsun Huang will surely be hoping that the GTX760 can be that card for 2013. The MESH brand has been around since 1987 and when we asked them for a powerful, affordable GTX760 SLi system for analysis, they happily obliged.


Read more: Gainward GTX 760 Phantom 2GB Graphics Card Review @ Kitguru

Next-Generation AMD Radeon Series Nomenclature Detailed @ TechPowerUp
Since the very first DirectX 10-ready graphics cards by AMD, we've been used to the "Radeon HD xyz0" nomenclature, in which "x" denoted generation, "y" market segment, and "z" variant. That all is about to change with the company's Volcanic Islands GPU family, which will be unveiled (at least to the press), later this month. Using the same "x, y, z" variables as mentioned before, the new nomenclature could look like "Radeon Ry xz i" (where the new variable "i" could denote special features).

An example of this new nomenclature could be, say, Radeon R9 280 X, where "9" denotes the high-end market segment, currently held by Radeon HD 7900 series, "2" indicating generation, and "80" denoting variant. "XT" (full-spec) chips could get the "80" marking, and "Pro" (partial-spec) chips could get the "60" or "70" marking, but it isn't fixed, and could even be "50" and "40" for lower-end parts. At this point, we can't even speculate what the "i" (special feature) could denote. For mobile parts, the letter "M" could be prefixed to the "xz" component of the model number (example: Radeon R9 M380 X). Validations for graphics cards running early drivers with this naming scheme, have been showing up on our GPU-Z Validation database for days now, and our analysis is our best understanding of their naming strings. Capiche? Can't blame you.


Read more: Next-Generation AMD Radeon Series Nomenclature Detailed @ TechPowerUp




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