EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified 3072 MB and more
Posted on: 01/15/2014 01:41 PM

Here a roundup of the latest reviews and articles, including EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified 3072 MB, Coolermaster Seidon 120V Liquid Cooling System Review, USB 2.0 vs. USB 3.0: Should You Upgrade Your Flash Drives?, Exclusive Kaveri interview with Nicolas Thibieroz of AMD, and SanDisk X210 256 And 512 GB: Enthusiast Speed; OEM Reliability

EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified 3072 MB @ techPowerUp
EVGA's GTX 780 Ti Classified is the fastest GTX 780 Ti we ever tested. It comes with a large overclock out of the box that makes it run above 1175 MHz most of the time. The dual-fan ACX heatsink also provides good cooling, resulting in low temperatures and stable operation at all times.


Read more: EVGA GTX 780 Ti Classified 3072 MB @ techPowerUp

Coolermaster Seidon 120V Liquid Cooling System Review @ FrostyTech
Coolermaster's Seidon 120V is an economical all-in-one liquid cooling solution that's especially suited to small PC cases and media centers. The compact 120mm aluminum heat exchanger ships with a single 120mm fan, so it doesn't take up too much space and make mounting to a rear/top fan vent cumbersome. The waterblock / pump is connected to the heat exchanger via 30cm of small diameter FEP tubing and installs easily onto the full range of Intel socket LGA775/115x/1366/2011 and AMD socket AM2/AM3/FM1/FM2 processors. The waterblock features a micro skived copper base plate for good metal-to-liquid heat conduction and the 120mm heat exchanger is made from aluminum


Read more: Coolermaster Seidon 120V Liquid Cooling System Review @ FrostyTech

Project Spark Video Preview with Kaeyi Dream @ HardwareHeaven.com
Today Kaeyi Dream gives us a look at Project Spark the upcoming title from Microsoft for XBOX One.


Read more: Project Spark Video Preview with Kaeyi Dream @ HardwareHeaven.com

RaidSonic ICY BOX IB-121CL-U3 HDD Docking & Clone Station @ NikKTech
Desktop Hard Drives were initially designed for people who either always wanted to keep a valid backup of their sensitive data or people who just preferred to have extra space outside of their systems so they could transfer them onto other systems with ease. Of course this changed with the introduction of portable hard drives and although desktop ones still feature higher capacities and data transfer speeds most consumers tend to prefer size over capacity and performance. Professionals however who work with several internal drives most of the time always had need for something more versatile and this is where docking stations came in a while back. Today docking stations have advanced quite a bit and also offer cloning capabilities between two drives something which can be very useful to some people especially professionals. The ICY BOX IB-121CL-U3 HDD Docking & Clone Station by RaidSonic is one such device and today we have it on our test bench.


Read more: RaidSonic ICY BOX IB-121CL-U3 HDD Docking & Clone Station @ NikKTech

Corsair CS450M Power Supply Review @ Legit Reviews
Corsair has been a very active player in the PSU market the past year, announcing release after release, bringing several new power supply units into the market. A few weeks ago, the company has announced the release of the CS-M power supply series, a series designed for basic and midrange PCs, bringing the number of the power-related products that they offer even higher. Even though the series is designed with value in mind, Corsair claims features and performance that would significantly outperform their previous mainstream series, the TX. Today we are having a close look at the CS450M, which, as the name implies, is the 450 W version and the least powerful unit of the series.


Read more: Corsair CS450M Power Supply Review @ Legit Reviews

USB 2.0 vs. USB 3.0: Should You Upgrade Your Flash Drives? @ Howtogeek
New computers have now been coming with USB 3.0 ports for years. But just how much faster is USB 3.0? Will you see a big speed improvement if you upgrade your old USB 2.0 flash drives? USB 3.0 devices are backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports. Theyll function normally, but only at USB 2.0 speeds. The only downside is that USB 3.0 devices are still a bit more expensive. Theoretical Speed Improvements USB is a standard and defines maximum signaling speeds for communicating across a USB port. The USB 2.0 standard offers a theoretical maximum signaling rate of 480 megabits per second, while USB 3.0 defines a maximum rate of 5 gigabits per second. In other words, USB 3.0 is theoretically more than ten times faster than USB 2.0. If the comparison ended here, upgrading would be a no brainer.


Read more: USB 2.0 vs. USB 3.0: Should You Upgrade Your Flash Drives? @ Howtogeek

Patriot Viper 8GB DDR3-2133 C11 (Low Profile) Memory Review @ FunkyKit
We had a chance to review Patriot Viper III memory series couple of months ago. Today's memory kit will be slightly different as it's "Low Profile" series. It's actually standard DDR3 size DIMM but heatsink design let it work with every available processor cooling.
Let's check our review and find out what Patriot Viper III 8GB DDR3-2133 Low Profile memory kit has to offer.
 

Read more: Patriot Viper 8GB DDR3-2133 C11 (Low Profile) Memory Review @ FunkyKit

Hands-on review: Lenovo Y50 review @ Techradar
Everyone knows Lenovo for its leading business and hybrid laptops (and sometimes both with the ThinkPad Yoga). But did you know that the Chinese vendor also makes gaming laptops? Amid the Alienwares and Origins of the world, it's easy to forget, but not for long.This is the Lenovo Y50, the successor to the company's Y510p gaming notebook and a first for Lenovo in several ways. Lenovo recognized that, even in the gaming clamshells, thin is most certainly in.


Read more: Hands-on review: Lenovo Y50 review @ Techradar

TR's big CES 2014 digest @ The Tech Report
We did this last year, and you guys seemed to enjoy it, so we've done it again. Here's a handy, shortbread-style list of every single news item we posted for this year's Consumer Electronics Show.


Read more: TR's big CES 2014 digest @ The Tech Report

AMD Kaveri Arrives: A8-7600 APU Review @ HotHardware
Way back in 2006, after the ATI acquisition, AMD laid out its Fusion initiative and future plans to integrate a CPU and GPU onto the same processor die. The ultimate goal of Fusion was to seamlessly combine CPU and GPU resources into a single, cohesive compute engine equally adept at handling serial and highly parallel workloads. At the time, the idea seemed ambitious, but history has shown that more and more external resources have consistently been brought onto the CPU die (memory controllers, IO hub, etc.) and graphics would be no different.

Since then, both Intel and AMD have quite successfully combined CPU and GPU engines onto single chips, but up to this point they have tended to work as autonomous islands. The CPU and GPU share some resources, but not a single memory pool. That changes today though, with the official launch of AMD’s Kaveri-based APUs, the first APUs to truly support heterogeneous computing.


Read more: AMD Kaveri Arrives: A8-7600 APU Review @ HotHardware

Exclusive Kaveri interview with Nicolas Thibieroz of AMD @ KitGuru
When KitGuru first spoke with AMD's Developer Relations guru Nic Thibieroz, back in May 2011, he had just taken over as point-man for the chip designer's drive into the hearts and minds of the developer community. Things have changed a lot over the past 32 months. We got the chance to pull Nic into a dark corner at AMD's recent Tech Day. This is what he revealed.


Read more: Exclusive Kaveri interview with Nicolas Thibieroz of AMD @ KitGuru

AMD Catalyst 13.12 WHQL tested @ ocaholic
Once more AMD has updated their Catalyst drivers and like always performance should be higher with the latest set. We've had a closer look at this driver version and ran a set of benchmarks and games on no less than 10 different AMD graphics cards, where there are models from the R9, HD 7000 and HD 6000 Series. Last but not least there are some rather surprising findings. 


Read more: AMD Catalyst 13.12 WHQL tested @ ocaholic

Interview: AMD on Kaveri: trumping Richland, beating Intel and Steam Machines @ Techradar
AMD's latest APU is heading into the wild today, and among its touted features is the ability to perform high-end functions with low power sap. Testing is needed to determine if Kaveri really pushes higher performance per watt while saving battery life, particularly in smaller form factors (AMD is targeting notebooks with the APU). But until then - and trust us, testing is on the way - AMD gave TechRadar a few cases in point where Kaveri trumps the APU and processing options we've seen to date. We even get a little insight on possible usage in Steam Machines, too.


Read more: Interview: AMD on Kaveri: trumping Richland, beating Intel and Steam Machines @ Techradar

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 @ techPowerUp
The Deep Silence 4 is Nanoxia's mATX offering for silent fans out there. Offering the ability to control up to six fans within the chassis while encapsulating the sound from within, this should be an interesting option for those wanting a compact system with as little noise as possible.


Read more: Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 @ techPowerUp

Func KB-460 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review @ TestFreaks
Func is a very well known company when it comes to gaming, I know they make some great mice and mousepads but they’ve just introduced a keyboard. For review today I have the Func KB-460 mechanical gaming keyboard which features Cherry MX red switches and red LED backlighting and the ability to program or should I say re-program the keys on the keyboard with preset commands or custom macros. For me mechanical keyboards are the best, once you use one you won’t go back to the membrane style surely, but they do come at a cost and there are many to choose from in terms of switch types. The Cherry MX Reds of the KB-460 are excellent, at least for me they are, I prefer reds over the other types, I like the blues or reds really as they are clicky and have a more tactile feel to them. The KB-460 also features red LEDs beneath every single key so they’re all lit up and you can choose from four levels of brightness. Read on…


Read more: Func KB-460 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review @ TestFreaks

Thecus N2310 NAS Server Network Storage Review @ Benchmark Reviews
The Thecus N2310 Network Attached Storage Server is a product that is breaking new ground for the NAS market. Power to the people, NASes for the masses, whatever you want to call it, the N2310 is about driving the cost of NAS ownership down. Thankfully, Thecus recognizes that no one wants a NAS that runs slow, or one that doesn't have modern features like mobile access. So, the N2310 is all about providing the lowest-cost, technically-acceptable solution. That's a fine line to tread, and many companies have tripped over themselves trying to do that. Benchmark Reviews has tested quite a few NAS products in the last few years, and we're in a good position to evaluate how well the Thecus N2310 meets its mission statement.


Read more: Thecus N2310 NAS Server Network Storage Review @ Benchmark Reviews

SanDisk X210 256 And 512 GB: Enthusiast Speed; OEM Reliability @ Toms Hardware
SanDisk's X210 SSD is both an OEM drive for major vendors and an aftermarket product for the enthusiast world. Having passed a gauntlet of validation tests, can it break into the consumer space as a true alternative to the quickest power user products?


Read more: SanDisk X210 256 And 512 GB: Enthusiast Speed; OEM Reliability @ Toms Hardware




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