Can Console Gaming Save AMD From Collapse? and more
Posted on: 04/12/2013 10:58 AM

Here a roundup of the latest reviews and articles, including Can Console Gaming Save AMD From Collapse?, Corsair CX430M Modular Power Supply Review, Samsung Galaxy Camera, 3D Printing and Borderlands 2 Ultimate Vault Hunter, and Upgrade And Benchmark Your 2012 MacBook Air's SSD

Can Console Gaming Save AMD From Collapse? @ Benchmark Reviews
One year ago Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NYSE:AMD) company stock was publically trading for $8.20 per share (16 March 2012), the highest point since trading at the same level a year prior (March 2010). Since then, AMD stock has sunk to as low as $1.86 per share, performing far worse than other stocks within the same industry. Analyzing the graph charted below, you can see that the Dow Jones Industrial averaged a 12% gain over that same one-year period from late March 2012-2013. Microprocessors company ARM ($18.6B current market capitalization) enjoyed a 51% growth over Dow Jones for this period, while NVIDIA ($7.8B) and Intel ($107.6B) slowly tapered off 16% and 22% respectively. AMD ($1.9B) is the standout here, dropping $4.53 Billion dollars in market capitalization value to sustain 65% under-performance below the Dow Jones. While the numbers don't lie, they don't always tell the entire story.


Read more: Can Console Gaming Save AMD From Collapse? @ Benchmark Reviews

Corsair CX430M Modular Power Supply Review - What $25 Can Buy @ Legit Reviews
Corsair is today a known manufacturer of performance power supplies and rightfully so, if we can judge from our reviews on their high end products. What of their basic series though? The CX430M hits our testing laboratory today, trying to prove that even sub-$25 products have what it takes to satisfy a demanding user.


Read more: Corsair CX430M Modular Power Supply Review - What $25 Can Buy @ Legit Reviews

ZTE Geek hands-on review @ The Inquirer
We get our mitts on ZTE's Clover Trail+ smartphone at IDF Beijing     


Read more: ZTE Geek hands-on review @ The Inquirer

SilverStone NT06-PRO CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets
We tested the SilverStone NT06-PRO CPU cooler. It has a horizontal heatsink, six heatpipes, a 120 mm fan, and is 3.2"(82 mm) tall, which makes it a viable option for small form factor (SFF) cases.


Read more: SilverStone NT06-PRO CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets

Kingston HyperX Beast 2400 MHz CL 11 2x 4 GB @ techPowerUp
A rabid animal hungry for food, the Kingston HyperX Beast stampedes into the overclocking scene, ripping through our benchmarks like no other. Clocked in at 2400 MHz out of the box, these beasts are ready to take on whatever you want to feed them.


Read more: Kingston HyperX Beast 2400 MHz CL 11 2x 4 GB @ techPowerUp

AMD A10-5700 Review @ Techradar
The AMD A10-5700 is a chip we're desperate to like. For starters, it's one of the most technically interesting CPUs around right now. You've got AMD's latest Piledriver architecture and all its funky hybrid core technology. Then there's an AMD Radeon HD 7660D graphics, the most powerful integrated core on Earth. In the end, however it's cold, hard numbers and practicality that counts, not intellectual niceties. On the latter point, the A10 falls at the first hurdle. Thanks to that integrated graphics core, it has different pin-out requirements to other AMD chips. And that means a unique socket, known as FM2.


Read more: AMD A10-5700 Review @ Techradar

Samsung Galaxy Camera @ MEGATech
Samsung has been tearing up the world of Android and they aren’t stopping at just phones. Samsung recently released the Samsung Galaxy Camera, a digital point and shoot powered by the Android OS. Samsung is not the first manufacturer to launch an Android camera–Nikon launched the Coolpix 800c in August of 2012–but with the popularity of their smartphones and their existing camera lineup, Samsung already has a strong following and market share.


Read more: Samsung Galaxy Camera @ MEGATech

3D Printing and Borderlands 2 Ultimate Vault Hunter @ Ninjalane
3D Printing has been in the news lately for some amazing breakthrus in what can be created. Typically a 3D printer is limited to creating small plastic pieces like statues, small machine parts and even practical items like clips and cup holders. As the technology has advanced so has the creativity of the designers, so much in fact, that we can now make replacement parts for the human body.

In this segment Darren talks about some of the cool things that 3D printing has brought to the market and Dennis shares a toy from his childhood called the Master Caster which allowed him to make wax cars on demand and remake them as he saw fit.


Read more: 3D Printing and Borderlands 2 Ultimate Vault Hunter @ Ninjalane

Kingston V300 240GB SSD Review @ Myce.com
The name Kingston is one of the most recognizable ones when it comes to memory storage, and in the past here at Myce we had the opportunity to take an in-depth look at some of their products such as the HyperX 3K and also the more affordable V+ 200. Kingston has now introduced a new member to the V series, the V300, which is Kingston’s latest SSD that is only 7mm thick, making it an ideal replacement for your ultrabook but also an excellent choice for a desktop upgrade. Kingston’s V300 not only offers a 7mm drive but also comes at a very attractive price, and comparing that with the usual high standards that we expect from Kingston, it should be a very obvious choice.

In this review we will be looking at all aspects of the Kingston V300, mainly focusing on performance although also taking other things into consideration, such as build quality and price.

Kingston was kind enough to send me the V300 upgrade edition SSD for a review. Before I start this review I will say a few things about the drive. The Kingston V300 is based on the LSI’s Sandforce controller, it comes in three capacities, 60GB/120GB and the highest one is the one that I will be testing, the 240GB drive. You can get the V300 in three different packages, the drive only, the Netbook package, and finally we have the Desktop package.


Read more: Kingston V300 240GB SSD Review @ Myce.com

CM Storm Scout II Advanced Case Review @ Hi Tech Legion
Cooler Master is well-known for their openness to user suggestions and some of the products we have seen at their CES 2013 suite in Las Vegas were results of input from their buyers. Some are new items while some are improved versions of their current line. One such product getting an improvement is the Scout II mid-tower case. The original Scout II case itself was a well-received and well-liked product, in fact as I mentioned in my review, it came very close to getting an HTL Editor’s Choice award. Cooler Master is re-introducing the case to the market with an “Advanced” version that will maintain the original MSRP.

The CM Storm Scout II Advanced is a mid-tower chassis that is part of Cooler Master’s gaming line. The CM Storm Scout II Advanced case further improves upon the initial Scout II offering with the addition of two more intake fans, an extra pair of tool-free HDD rails and one more SSD mounting bracket. Aside from the midnight black and gunmetal gray color versions of the initial Scout II case, the advanced version will also be available in a “ghost white” version, outfitted with white LED fans instead of red LED. While the CM Storm Scout II Advanced carries the same retail price of $99.99 as the original Scout II, the ghost white version will be available for $109.99 and all versions carry a two-year warranty.


Read more: CM Storm Scout II Advanced Case Review @ Hi Tech Legion

ROCCAT Isku FX – The FX Stands for ‘Features in eXcess’ @ Techgage
Today I’m playing with something that’s a little bit out of the ordinary.

You see, your humble Techgage scribe here has been using mechanical keyboards almost exclusively for the last few years now. Only when I’m at my day job or when I’m on my laptop do I not use a mech. However, I promise you that I won’t let my preference for mechs color my review.

The ROCCAT Isku FX is a membrane keyboard with dome-type switches. It is currently the company’s top-of-the-line gaming keyboard. Soon, that title will shift on over to the company’s first mechanical, Ryos.


Read more: ROCCAT Isku FX – The FX Stands for ‘Features in eXcess’ @ Techgage

Antichamber just blew my mind @ The Tech Report
In his latest blog post, TR's Geoff Gasior tries to figure out Antichamber, a critically acclaimed indie game that takes the first-person puzzle genre into a whole other dimension.


Read more: Antichamber just blew my mind @ The Tech Report

Dell UltraSharp U2713H 27” AH-IPS Monitor Review @ Hardware Canucks
Dell’s new 27” U2713H is the Ultrasharp monitor many have been waiting for. It uses a high quality 2560x1440 AH-IPS panel and incorporates all of the latest technologies in order to ensure accurate color reproduction and professional-grade image quality. More importantly, Dell has implemented a number of features that should allow their latest creation to feel right at home in professional and gaming environments alike.

In order to place the U2713H, you need to understand how Dell has been gradually evolving their high end Ultrasharp lineup. The initial “gold standard” of the 27” monitor market was the U2711, a monitor which has been hanging tenaciously on since early 2010. In the world of lightning quick product cycles, three years between refreshes may seem like a lot but it is actually a testament to the U2711’s lasting appeal.

Now, some may argue that the UltraSharp U2713HM could have been considered the spiritual successor to the legendary U2711 but Dell never intended it to fill those large shoes. We actually experienced this firsthand within our review. With that being said, the U2713H will be taking over the status as a 27” flagship monitor.


Read more: Dell UltraSharp U2713H 27” AH-IPS Monitor Review @ Hardware Canucks

ViewSonic TD2340 23in Touchscreen Display Video Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Today Kaeyi Dream takes a look at the ViewSonic TD2340 Touch-screen LCD Display. Check it out!


Read more: ViewSonic TD2340 23in Touchscreen Display Video Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

Upgrade And Benchmark Your 2012 MacBook Air's SSD @ Tom's Hardware
We take our lab's MacBook Air, yank out its stock Toshiba-sourced SSD, drop in OWC's 480 GB Auro Pro 6G, and chart the performance of both drives. Follow our step-by-step guide for upgrading your own MBA (and even getting TRIM support re-enabled).


Read more: Upgrade And Benchmark Your 2012 MacBook Air's SSD @ Tom's Hardware

GTX 650 Ti Boost SLI reviewed @ Fudzilla
As we demonstrated in our previous GTX 650 Ti Boost reviews, from Gainward’s and EVGA’s stables, Nvidia’s new card seems to tick all the right boxes and hit the sweet spot. It can cope with 1080p gaming at high detail settings, it can deliver reasonable frame rates and it doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.

Performance is adequate for most titles at 1080p, and even when the GTX 650 Ti Boost runs out of steam, it is relatively easy to tinker with detail levels and get playable frame rates. It is quite simply a very good choice for gamers on a budget, who don’t want to sacrifice a lot of visual quality, but don’t want to break the bank and get a high-end card.

However, the GTX 650 Ti Boost is the cheapest SLI capable card on the market. It doesn’t sound like much of a selling point in this market segment, but on the other hand the Boost is a relatively capable card, so the decision to include SLI support sounds interesting. True, it might be better to invest €300 in a high-end Radeon or Geforce rather than go for an SLI setup with two GTX 650 Ti Boost cards, but then again SLI could come in handy when it’s time to upgrade.


Read more: GTX 650 Ti Boost SLI reviewed @ Fudzilla

Asustor AS 602T Review @ KitGuru
We have reviewed many NAS systems over the last two years and today we are looking at our first product from Asustor, a subsidiary group of electronics giant ASUS. The 602T is a dual drive system with full cross platform support.


Read more: Asustor AS 602T Review @ KitGuru




Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/can_console_gaming_save_amd_from_collapse_and_more.html)