ASUS GeForce GTX 760 MARS Review and more
Posted on: 11/21/2013 12:29 PM

Here a roundup of today's reviews and articles, including ASUS GeForce GTX 760 MARS Review, MSI Primo 81 (Snow White) 8" Tablet Review, OCZ Vertex 450 128GB SSD Review, Photo Studio HD for iOS, and How to find out how much RAM your motherboard supports

ASUS GeForce GTX 760 MARS Review @ Guru3D
We review, test and benchmark the new GeForce GTX 760 MARS from ASUS. Now you'd think this is a beefed up GTX 760, but the secret sauce really is that it has two 760 GPUs. Yup, the ASUS GeForce GTX 760 MARS has been locked and loaded with two GPUs on a single PCB. That also means a customized PCB and an all new cooler. We have lots to talk about and to show of course, as we'll check the card out with our regular benchmarks, Ultra HD testing, FLIR thermal imaging and a handful of FCAT frametime results as well. Bring it on - Game on !

We've seen the original brutal Mars, the exemplary ARES series but the ROG team from ASUS is at it again with the all new GTX 760 Mars, yep that's right. The x-factor products makes it prodigal son return to manage a little bump and grinding in the gaming arena. But yeah, ASUS took the GeForce GTX 690 concept and pretty much only took two GeForce GTX 760 GPUs, ASUS merged these onto a single PCB and each of them GPUs is tick-tocking away at 1006 MHz while boosting towards 1072 MHz, making the Mars perform at GeForce GTX 780 Ti and Radeon R9 290X performance levels. You are going to notice that ASUS decided to not spare any expense here, the GTX 760 Mars has a very sturdy metal shroud with two 90mm fans, and a metal back plate covers the entire rear. All that power comes at another cost though, the Mars II is a bit wider than usual, in addition to taking up two, actually almost three slots. Its dimensions are considerable. You'll need a beefy power supply as well as not one, but two 8-pin PCIe power connectors are required


Read more: ASUS GeForce GTX 760 MARS Review @ Guru3D

MSI Primo 81 (Snow White) 8" Tablet Review @ KitGuru
Today we are going to take a look at the Primo 81 from MSI. Priced at only £138, it targets the large user base who can't afford a high end model from the likes of Samsung or Apple. The Primo 81 features a 7.8" IPS display, the same LG panel used on the last generation iPad Mini. Is the product tempting enough to warrant a purchase?


Read more: MSI Primo 81 (Snow White) 8" Tablet Review @ KitGuru

OCZ Fatal1ty 750W PSU Review @ Guru3D
We review the OCZ Fatal1ty 750W PSU. The power supply became available market a little ago and it one of the more popular models from OCZ. It offers Bronze efficiency, a single 12V rail. The PSU itself is modular has good looks and something you can appreciate for those of you with a side panel window in their chassis. Being 750W and with all the aforementioned features the PSU is priced in a 75 EUR range here in the Netherlands. To top it off, OCZ even gives this PSU a 5 year carry in warranty.

So, who really knows or even cares about Fatal1ty outside of the USA these days? That said, OCZ did something interesting. If we forget about the Fatal1ty branding, then they did come up with a product that is appealing to the masses. A nice 750 Watt PSU, it is fully modular, good looks and thin sleeved cabling is what the product we test today all about. Next to that energy efficient models are a trend. Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum is, however the upper stack in hardware is expensive. This product comes with a Bronze certification, and that's quite decent as our test will show you. The power supply is on the market for a little while now already and it one of the more popular models. It offers Bronze efficiency, a single 12V rail. The PSU itself is modular has good looks and something you can appreciate for those of you with a side panel window in their chassis. Being 750W and with all the aforementioned features the PSU is priced in the 75 EUR range here in the Netherlands, which is just really affordable. To top it off, OCZ even gives this 75 EUR PSU a 5 year carry in warranty.


Read more: OCZ Fatal1ty 750W PSU Review @ Guru3D

Seagate 2TB ST2000DX001 SATA3 SSHD Review @ OcInside.de
We have already published some SSD and HDD reviews on OCinside.de and for quite some time we are also testing the combination of solid state drive and hard disk drive in one drive - the so-called SSHD.
The advantages of the SSHD are obvious: The price is several times below a SSD with identical capacity.
Now we like to answer the question if the SSHD can keep at least partially with a SSD, or if it is more on the level of a conventional hard disk.
Seagate send us their latest Seagate ST2000DX001 SATA3 desktop SSHD consisting of a 2 TB hard drive with 8 GB MLC memory, which we will test in this review.


Read more: Seagate 2TB ST2000DX001 SATA3 SSHD Review @ OcInside.de

Enermax iVektor (ECA3310) Mid-Tower Case Review @ HiTech Legion
Changing of the seasons often reveals interesting behaviors in humans. As winter approaches, I get to have some really fun conversations as friends ask how I can stay warm wearing shorts and t-shirts below 50 degrees. The same people don’t realize it’s still only 50 degrees when they talk about the warmth of spring. Personally, I love cold weather, so I’m always entertained when some of my Floridian friends post pictures on Facebook of themselves wearing sweaters on the beach while the air is still 70 degrees. Of course, there are also the people I know from Alaska who will walk through snow in bare feet to take out the trash.

Fortunately, computers aren’t affected by relative temperatures changes like us humans. They don’t care if last week it was ten degrees warmer outside. Processors, drives and other components each have their specific temperature range in which they’ll function properly, and as long as they stay in that range they’ll keep chugging along for years. This is why it’s important to assemble the components inside a case that’s up to the task of keeping them within that temperature range. Style and features won’t mean anything if your CPU overheats, so the most important design function of a modern computer case is to get the heat away from the hot components and minimize the case’s propensity to act as insulation.


Read more: Enermax iVektor (ECA3310) Mid-Tower Case Review @ HiTech Legion

REVIEW: Acoustic Research ARS60 Speakers @ PureOverclock
Today we have the opportunity to review the ARS60 Bluetooth enabled speaker from Acoustic Research. This is their next generation speaker and it comes packed with features. It also sports a compact design without losing its design quality. It is available in black, red, blue, white, lime green, pink or yellow. The design is shaped like an hour-glass but features two speakers with a bass reflex system. This system also features a NiMH rechargeable battery, offering ten hours of music play time (at medium volume). Could this 16 watt system sound as good as what we’ve seen with other Bluetooth speakers?

Continue reading to find out if it holds up to our standards.


Read more: REVIEW: Acoustic Research ARS60 Speakers @ PureOverclock

Sony Smartwatch 2 SW2 for Android Smartphones @ MEGATech
If you listened to the technologists and industry analysts last year, they would have told you that 2013 was going to be the year of the smartwatch. That hasn’t really come to pass, as the smartwatch still isn’t exactly a mainstream thing, but the format has gained in popularity. One product that slipped quietly under the radar is the Sony SmartWatch 2 (SW2), a device that will play friendly with just about any contemporary Android smartphone.


Read more: Sony Smartwatch 2 SW2 for Android Smartphones @ MEGATech

OCZ Vertex 450 128GB SSD Review @ Neoseeker
As processor and chipset technologies continue to deliver faster and more responsive systems, it is easy to overlook a crucial part of the equation; the hard drive. The majority of systems on the market today utilize the 6GB/s SATA 3 interface, and yet many people overlook the potential bottlenecking of their PC or laptop's performance as a result of the hard drive. This is where the solid state drive (SSD) steps in to help reduce this issue by giving your system a serious shot in the arm of pure adrenalin.

OCZ has manufactured some outstanding products so far, their SSD lineup included. I will be taking a look at a pair of OCZ Vertex 450 128GB SSDs in both single and Raid 0 configuration. Using this method we will get a better look at the overall performance of the Vertex 450 SSD..


Read more: OCZ Vertex 450 128GB SSD Review @ Neoseeker

Corsair H80i @ LanOC Reviews
Today we are back with another AIO water cooling solution, this time from Corsair’s award-winning Hydro series. While Corsair has certainly been the king of the mountain for a while in the AIO market, competitors have recently made some quite impressive challenges to the throne. The H80i promises high performance cooling and unparalleled control via its built-in Corsair Link controller in a package fitting the Corsair name. With integrated Corsair Link functionality and a push-pull fan configuration where will the H80i land on our charts? Read on to find out.


Read more: Corsair H80i @ LanOC Reviews

Cooler Master Cosmos SE @ techPowerUp
Cooler Master Cosmos cases: Large and capable, these come with a hefty price tag to match. The Cosmos SE looks like a smaller version of its bigger brother, but has Cooler Master sacrificed cool features, or has the company created a new universe in the sky?


Read more: Cooler Master Cosmos SE @ techPowerUp

Fractal Design Arc XL High Airflow Full Tower Case Review @ Legit Reviews
Fractal Design is a fairly new company designing computer hardware with a Scandinavian flair. This gives their cases a functional, clean, and sleek design. Previously Legit Reviews had the opportunity to take a look at their ARC Midi R2 case, a mid-tower; there is also a smaller version in the ARC line, the ARC Mini R2. Now, they have given us the chance to look at the big brother model, the ARC XL.


Read more: Fractal Design Arc XL High Airflow Full Tower Case Review @ Legit Reviews

GeForce GTX 760 SLI vs GTX Titan @ ocaholic
Maybe you're one of the gamers out there who simply can't have enough power coming from the graphics department or maybe you want to asseble a gaming rig with a given budget and you want to get the very maximum out of it. In both cases the following article might be interesting and it might be quite surprising to see how well to GTX 760 in an SLI can keep up with the mighty GTX Titan.


Read more: GeForce GTX 760 SLI vs GTX Titan @ ocaholic

Photo Studio HD for iOS @ TUAW
I had high hopes for Photo Studio HD, a universal US$1.99 app that provides an extremely wide selection of tools to edit and enhance photos.

The problem is, I really couldn't import any pictures and truly improve them using the app. The issues started when I opened a landscape image with the result that it lost most of its resolution and looked blurry and blocky. Not good for an app that calls itself Photo Studio HD.

In addition, the app's editing tools are difficult to launch. When you swipe across the scrolling list, sometimes a tool near your finger opens, instead of the expected movement to the next tool.


Read more: Photo Studio HD for iOS @ TUAW

Ubiquiti Networks mFi mPower Wi-Fi Power Strip Review @ Anandtech
The Internet of Things (IoT) revolution is happening right now. As smartphones proliferate, consumers want the ability to control devices in an automated and easy manner. Remotely switching a power outlet is one of the basic building blocks of an automation system (home or business building). Last year, we reviewed Visible Energy's UFO Power Center, a standalone device which combined energy awareness and home automation in a striking package. Today, we are looking at a device with similar features, but catering to a very different market segment. Read on for our review of the Ubiquiti mPower mFi 3-port power outlet with Wi-Fi control.    


Read more: Ubiquiti Networks mFi mPower Wi-Fi Power Strip Review @ Anandtech

Be Quiet! Power Zone 650W / 750W review: affordable quality @ Hardware.Info
The German power supply manufacturer Be Quiet! launched a new series of affordable 80Plus Bronze PSUs under the name Power Zone. We tested the 650W and 750W models.

Be Quiet! developed the new Power Zone line of products in order to provide customers with energy-efficient power supplies that are also affordable. The series has four different models: 650W, 750W, 850W and 1000W. They're all based on a design by FSP, who also manufactures the power supplies. Be Quiet! claims it has optimised the PSUs in a number of ways. They're 80Plus Bronze certified and should be up to 90 percent efficient according to the manufacturer.


Read more: Be Quiet! Power Zone 650W / 750W review: affordable quality @ Hardware.Info

CM Storm Pitch In-ear Gaming Headset @ techPowerUp
CM Storm is known to produce some very good budget gaming gear, and we take a look at their newest little addition today: the Pitch in-ear gaming headset. At only €29 MSRP, it comes complete with a good bundle ready for gaming on phones, tablets, and laptops


Read more: CM Storm Pitch In-ear Gaming Headset @ techPowerUp

How to find out how much RAM your motherboard supports @ gHacks
One of the reasons why PC sales have slumped, at least in my opinion, is the fact that many users do not see the need to upgrade their systems as often as before.

Back in the days, upgrading the processor from a 486 to a Pentium, or a Pentium to a Pentium II, was a huge deal, as were upgrades to system RAM (128 Megabyte for the win), or the video card.

Today, upgrades do not yield those high performance gains anymore. Sure, it is nice if you install a new video card to get even more frame rates out of games you play, or a faster processor to convert those media files faster, but all in all, the gains are not as noticeable as before unless you are updating a very old system.


Read more: How to find out how much RAM your motherboard supports @ gHacks

Noctua NH-L9i and NH-L9a CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware 360
HTPC builds require not only a heat sink with a physically smaller dimensions, but one that performs silently. Small fan size generally means the exact opposite due to the higher RPM requirement just to produce as much airflow as a larger fan size equivalent, so finding the balance is always an issue that many heat sink manufacturers have tried to tackle. Smaller motherboards also pose clearance issues in terms of compatibility with larger aluminum arrays preventing RAM, expansion card installation and plugging in cables. Understandably, many heat sink manufacturers don`t even bother to offer any HTPC heat sink solution due to these design requirements if the smaller profit margin due to the niche target and low price wasn`t enough to discourage them in the first place.

There are some companies such as Noctua however who specialize in cooling, so the challenge of creating a perfect HTPC heat sink is something they do not run away from but rather run towards enthusiastically. While Noctua has the 66mm tall NH-L12 HTPC cooler, many users are clamoring for an even lower profile cooler that can fit under 1U form-factor requirements.


Read more: Noctua NH-L9i and NH-L9a CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware 360

MSI Radeon R9 270 Gaming OC Graphics Card Review @ Hardware 360
AMD has released an onslaught of graphics cards in a short period of time and the “Volcanic Islands” family continues to grow with the release of the AMD Radeon R9 270.

The 270, is similar to that the 270x, but it comes with a more wallet friendly MSPR than the 270x that brings the “Volcanic Island” graphics under the $200 mark – this model retails for just $179. At this price point the 270 can be considered the replacement for the 7850, making its closet competitor the Nvidia GTX 660, which costs around $199. However, there are rebates that bring the price of the 660 down to the $180 range, and it’s conceivable Nvidia will lower the price of the GTX 660 even further after this launch.

If you are familiar with the Gaming series you will know doubt see the familiarity in this card. It uses the signature red and black color scheme along with a TWIN FROZR cooler that features a large Aluminum fin grid array providing a huge amount of surface area for cooling. In addition, the 270 Gaming graphics card uses MSI’s SuperPipe technology, dual cooling fans and it comes with their Military Class 4 power design.


Read more: MSI Radeon R9 270 Gaming OC Graphics Card Review @ Hardware 360

Powercolor Radeon R9-290X @ Bjorn3D
Powercolor has been a long time AMD partner and like the Devil card we looked at recently they have made a name for themselves with many special edition including high end liquid cooled cards.

Today I have their OC version of the 290X which has a small bump to the boost clock of the card which should net us some nice performance, but first things first.

As you know the 290X launched a little while ago and unfortunately AMD had a very strict list of places they sent cards to, well this means that this is a bit behind what you may have already read on the card but since the card is already launched it also means I get to spend a bit more time with it rather than rushing to meet an NDA date.


Read more: Powercolor Radeon R9-290X @ Bjorn3D

G.Skill F3-2133C9Q-16GXL (4x4GB) Memory Review @ Hexus
Continual improvements in CPU technology have limited the potential of high-speed system memory as a means of increasing performance for everyday tasks. Better-specified RAM does make sense if you're intent on running integrated graphics, however, as they pull their framebuffer from the main pool of system memory.

Appreciating that there aren't quantum leaps in performance for systems housing discrete graphics cards, faster memory therefore makes sense if it can be purchased as a relatively cheap upgrade over generic RAM. Taiwanese manufacturer G.Skill splits its desktop range into no fewer than 12 brands, which are further differentiated into various speeds, latencies and modules. The RipjawsX line is home to a veritable cornucopia of modules ranging from DDR3-1,333MHz to DDR3-2,400MHz speeds. Today, we're taking a look at a quad-module pack rated at DDR3-2,133MHz.


Read more: G.Skill F3-2133C9Q-16GXL (4x4GB) Memory Review @ Hexus




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