All-round PC August 2014 and more
Posted on: 08/06/2014 12:07 PM

Here a roundup of todays reviews and articles:

8 Ways To Spell & Grammar Check In Microsoft Word Using Different Dictionaries & Languages
A quick look at Diamond's Xtreme Sound XS71HDU
All-round PC August 2014
ASRock Z97 Anniversary Edition Review
CM Storm QuickFire Rapid-i Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review
Cooltek W1 Review
Hynix SH920 128GB SSD Review
Microsofts Surface Pro 3: Core i3 vs. Core i5 Battery Life
Netgear ReadyNAS 516 Review
Nokia Lumia 635 Review
NZXT H440 ATX Computer Enclosure Reviewed
Phanteks Enthoo Pro Case Review
Radeon Gallium3D Is Running Increasingly Well Against AMD's Catalyst Driver
Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 6TB Review
Thermaltake Commander G41 Review

8 Ways To Spell & Grammar Check In Microsoft Word Using Different Dictionaries & Languages
Microsoft Words built-in spelling and grammar checking tools work automatically most of the time, but there are many ways to customize them. You can even use AutoCorrect to speed up your typing. We used Word 2013 for this article. The interface should be fairly similar on Word 2010, too. In-line Spell Checking By default, Word will use in-line spell checking. Words you misspell will appear with a red squiggly underline just right-click the word you meant to type to correct each typo. Of course, Word doesnt know every word that exists especially names of things.


Read full article @ MakeUseOf

A quick look at Diamond's Xtreme Sound XS71HDU
We love sound cards here at TR, but they don't fit in every kind of PC. Diamond's Xtreme Sound XS71HDU serves up the same kinds of features in a tiny USB package suitable for mini-PCs and ultrabooks. We took it for a spin to see if it's as good as it looks.


Read full article @ The Tech Report

All-round PC August 2014
The all-round PC is a PC with comprehensive features for around £650 - £750 that can do a little bit of everything. It should have enough speed and capacity to meet your needs for some time. Currently it can run all applications, and you're able to upgrade it with small future investments when you need more power or storage capacity.

Surfing, gaming, business applications, photo and video editing should all be possible on the all-round PC without giving you the feeling that it's lacking in performance.

This means a fast processor and graphics card with an excellent price/ performance ratio, in combination with more than enough memory and storage space. Let's not forget a good computer case and a power supply that will remain energy efficient and silent enough for some years to come. Since the monitor, mouse and keyboard will be used daily you should definitely not skimp on these peripherals.


Read full article @ Hardware.Info

ASRock Z97 Anniversary Edition Review
The perfect partner to the G3258 Anniversary Edition CPU? Motherboard manufacturers are continually looking at ways to differentiate their boards from the competition. This task is becoming increasingly difficult as Intel and AMD integrate more and more technology into the processor itself, leaving board designers little room for innovation. We have shown that inexpensive Intel Z97 boards perform as well as dearer ones even when the CPU is overclocked by a healthy degree.

ASRock, meanwhile, is looking to use the positive commotion surrounding the Pentium Anniversary Edition chip - unlocked from the factory - to focus attention on a particular board in the Z97 line-up. It's of no surprise that it's called the Z97 Anniversary, coinciding with the processor, and it's available in standard ATX and micro-ATX form factors.


Read full article @ Hexus

CM Storm QuickFire Rapid-i Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review
For years now Cooler Master has brought to the masses affordable and clean minimalist looking mechanical keyboards in the form of the QuickFire lineup. While the aesthetic stands in contrast to the rugged looks and military themes of their other signature products, the attention to quality Cooler Master has become so trusted upon is still there. The original tenkeyless Quick Fire Rapid was popular due to its value, space saving functionality, and solid construction, but backlights were on the list as the most requested feature. Earlier this year, the Rapid-i with Cherry MX Brown switches with individually backlit white LEDs was released and now a new Cherry MX Blue switch model has been introduced which we are reviewing.


Read full article @ Legit Reviews

Cooltek W1 Review
There are plenty of cube cases out there, but many lack real innovation. Cooltek aims to take cube gaming enclosures to the next level with the W1. Featuring a smart combination of aluminum and steel and a choice between a windowed or solid side panel.


Read full article @ techPowerUp

Hynix SH920 128GB SSD Review
It’s not often that a new manufacturer comes into a mature market, but that’s what we’re seeing in the KitGuru Labs today. Hynix, one of the world’s largest producers of memory chips, has decided to get serious in the SSD market with the SH920 – almost a year after its toe-in-the-water SH910A product. Join us as we put the Hynix SH920 128GB SSD under the microscope.


Read full article @ KitGuru

Microsofts Surface Pro 3: Core i3 vs. Core i5 Battery Life
A couple of weeks ago I offered a brief performance preview of the $799 entry level Surface Pro 3 with an Intel Core i3-4020Y. The performance hit in going down to the $799 model is significant but compared to an upgraded ARM tablet you do get substantially more functionality/performance. The big unknown at the time was battery life. Going down to a Y-series part comes with a reduction in TDP (15W down to 11.5W), which could have power implications.

I spent the past week running and re-running battery life tests on the Core i3 model of the Surface Pro 3. For the most part, battery life hasn't changed. As you'll see from our laptop results, the Core i3 Surface Pro 3's battery life shows a slight regression compared to our Core i5 results but not significantly so


Read full article @ Anandtech

Netgear ReadyNAS 516 Review
Today we are checking out one of the most powerful desktop ReadyNAS solutions from Netgear. Supporting up to 84TB of storage, three eSATA ports and up to 250 concurrent users, the ReadyNAS 516 is designed for business applications. Powering the 516 is an Intel Core i3 "Ivy Bridge" desktop processor which is supported by 4GB of memory...

Most consumer grade NAS devices are designed around relatively low-cost system-on-chip solutions such as those made by Marvell, Freescale or Mindspeed. Typically more powerful higher-end units have been paired with Intel Atom “Cedarview” processors with some models now adopting dual-core CE SoC Atom processors based on the "Berryville" architecture.


Read full article @ Legion Hardware

Nokia Lumia 635 Review
A killer new budget handset. If you're looking for a great budget smart phone, this year's entry from Nokia—the Lumia 635—is a winner. Yes, it gets dinged for a few budget-minded compromises, but the Lumia 635 carries on the proud tradition of the Lumia 520/521, and does so in a bigger, more comfortable form factor that retains the vaunted Nokia look and feel.


Read full article @ WinSupersite

NZXT H440 ATX Computer Enclosure Reviewed
Many enthusiasts are starting to gravitate towards clean looking cases. And companies like NZXT are willing to deliver them. While this trend has gone so far as removing even optical drive bays, end users still occasionally need DVD/physical media to build systems or install games. However, the majority of physical media has shifted away towards downloadable content. Even the best system integrators are now offering systems that don’t include optical drives. For workstations, it means one less security hole in an important system.

The NZXT H440 enclosure we are reviewing today, sports a clean design that pleases the eyes but follows the digital trend. You won’t find any ROM dive slots or other clutter. The facade is smooth, artistic and even logical. Let me show you what the face of clean looks like.


Read full article @ Futurelooks

Phanteks Enthoo Pro Case Review
Do you remember your first day of school? All the preparation that goes in beforehand, gathering all your books, supplies, new clothes, new shoes, and possibly the nervousness of entering into another year of your life. The challenges that lie ahead, the possibilities of failures, and the excitement of triumphs! On the first day, you would meet your new teacher for that year, the person that was going to assist you through the coursework, and help you with any troubles you may have. All the rush of excitement and fear of the unknown coming together for an experience that stays with most of us our entire lives. New faces, some that we already know, and above all, the thought of growing and learning from everything about to be set forth before us.


Read full article @ HiTech Legion

Radeon Gallium3D Is Running Increasingly Well Against AMD's Catalyst Driver
After last week running new Nouveau vs. NVIDIA proprietary Linux graphics benchmarks, here's the results when putting AMD's hardware on the test bench and running both their latest open and closed-source drivers. Up today are the results of using the latest Radeon Gallium3D graphics code and Linux kernel against the latest beta of the binary-only Catalyst driver.

Similar to the NVIDIA GeForce tests of last week, on the open-source side was the Linux 3.16 kernel with Mesa 10.3-devel and other updated graphics user-space using the Oibaf PPA on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS x86_64. When benchmarking the proprietary Catalyst 14.6 Beta driver from mid-July, we had to pull back to the Linux 3.14 kernel for kernel compatibility with this binary blob release.


Read full article @ Phoronix

Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 6TB Review
On a normal day, I tend to have about 110GB of storage on me. That's just counting my cellphone's internal storage, one extra MicroSD card, and the Patriot Stellar USB/OTG attached to my keychain. Nothing fancy by today's standards you might argue; but if we take a step back a couple decades or so, such amount of portable storage capacity would be considered science-fiction. The younger generations might not realise that back in the 80's, 1.44MB "high density" floppy disks were used to carry digital content around. The same applies to the internal storage category where the evolution of hard disk drives over the years is simply amazing. In 1980, Seagate introduced the ST-506, world first 5.25-inch hard disk drive which could store up to 5MB of data at an insanely hefty price-tag of $1500 USD back then. Three decades later, Seagate is at it again with the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4. This 6TB drive is the first device of this capacity that doesn't rely on Helium-filled enclosure to achieve such numbers, which is the case of its direct competitor, the HGST He6.

The Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 is a 6000GB behemoth of a drive. As the name implies, we got an enterprise-class piece of hardware that offers a 50% capacity increase over the largest drives available to date which are "only" 4TB in size. Seagate did not assign the Enterprise label just for the size, as this drive is said to provide a 25% performance boost over competing units along with best-in-class response times, self-encryption, and Instant Secure Erase technology. Seagate built the Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 to be extremely reliable for 24/7 usage scenarios, it can withstand workloads of up 550TB per year and comes with an MTBF rating of 1.4M hours. These numbers might not mean much to the average user that may have a hard enough time filling the 1TB drives that most laptops and desktops are shipping with lately. For the extreme-enthusiast and professional IT crowd however, this drive just might be a god-send. It offers tremendous value for data center applications, surveillance systems, cloud storage solutions, and other hyperscale computing environments.

The Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 6TB can be yours if you are willing to spend $600 USD per unit. The price-tag might seem quite steep but let's face it, having a couple of these monsters in a RAID 0 setup or in a JBOD NAS enclosure is so tempting! Today however, I will be looking at a single unit implementation only.


Read full article @ Neoseeker

Thermaltake Commander G41 Review
It's no secret that this chassis overall temperatures is higher than most of its competition. The fact that it's a compact mid-tower plays into its overall temperatures and airflow. It's expected that the temperatures would be higher than a full tower just because the fact everything is closer together, which translates into the same amount of heat in a smaller space. Some of this can be resolved by removing the top hard drive cage to allow larger video cards and or more space for the card to breath. The simple fact that the chassis airflow is limited because of the low RPM pre-installed fans is the main reason for this. I'm glad Thermaltake did include a front and rear fan which is essential to achieving good temperatures, but lacking the ability to mount a second front fan is strange to me when the space is available


Read full article @ OCC




Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/all_round_pc_august_2014_and_more.html)