5 Gadgets To Look Out For In 2013 and more
Posted on: 03/07/2013 12:40 PM

Here a roundup of the latest reviews and articles, including 5 Gadgets To Look Out For In 2013, Leave Six Strikes Alone!, AMD vs Nvidia: Radeon 7870 vs GeForce 660 Using Frame Times, MOS Magnetic Organization System Review, and CeBIT 2013 Event Gallery and Video Interviews

5 Gadgets To Look Out For In 2013 @ ThinkComputers.org
2013 has already started out to be an exciting year. One of my favorite things to do is see what cool gadgets will be coming out each year. You should see all of these Gadgets this year and they are very exciting and innovative. While a few perform simple tasks others seems like they are out of the future. So here are my 5 Gadgets to look out for in 2013. After you are done reading the list let me know what gadget you are looking forward to the most.


Read more: 5 Gadgets To Look Out For In 2013 @ ThinkComputers.org

Thermalright Archon SB-E X2 CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets
Let's test the Thermalright Archon SB-E X2, a CPU cooler with a tower heatsink, eight U-shaped heatpipes, and two 140 mm fans.


Read more: Thermalright Archon SB-E X2 CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets

ADATA DashDrive Air AE400 Review @ KitGuru
Today we are looking at the new product from ADATA “ the DashDrive Air AE400. The AE400 can interact with your PC and mobile devices to stream data from SD memory cards and USB storage media via wireless technology. It is also equipped with a power reserve which can charge mobile devices.


Read more: ADATA DashDrive Air AE400 Review @ KitGuru

Kingston 10th Anniversary HyperX 16GB 2133MHz DDR3 Review @ Vortez
As the name suggests, Kingston have been churning out their HyperX range of memory kits for 10 years now and are proven leaders in the highly contested memory market. The kit on review today is a celebration of that fact. Weighing in at a speedy 2133MHz the kit arrives with sleek yet stylish special edition silver heat spreaders that are bound to stand out in any system.

Firm favourites among overclockers and system builders alike, the HyperX range caters for every pocket and has proven very popular over the years because not only is there a wide selection of speeds and sizes available with every Kingston product but they also come with a lifetime warranty so you can be assured that the product you are buying is quality, durable and thus will stand the test of time.


Read more: Kingston 10th Anniversary HyperX 16GB 2133MHz DDR3 Review @ Vortez

Gateway One ZX4970G-UW308 Review @ TechReviewSource.com
For users looking to save both money and space, few choices are as attractive and well-rounded as the Gateway One ZX4970G-UW308, a Windows 8-equipped all-in-one desktop. Although its sub-$600 entails a few necessary compromises, the One ZX4970G-UW308 nicely acquits itself of these shortcomings by packing some nifty tricks up its sleeve.


Read more: Gateway One ZX4970G-UW308 Review @ TechReviewSource.com

LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold Certified Power Supply Review @ Modders-Inc
My overall impression of the LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold Certified Power Supply is that its right on par with the other top quality PSUs available out there at even higher prices. Nope, I would not hesitate for one second to run the LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold Certified Power Supply in my primary gaming rig.


Read more: LEPA G850-MAS 80 PLUS Gold Certified Power Supply Review @ Modders-Inc

Tenda W311R+ Review @ Vortez
In today's networking market, there are a plethora of companies and products providing businesses and consumers alike with many different networking solutions. The market has changed considerably over the past decade and with the desire to have top performing products, with stylish sleek looks at a fantastic price, companies can't afford to get it wrong. Many companies have been evolving and providing us with such solutions for over the years but today, we will be focusing on one in particular.


Read more: Tenda W311R+ Review @ Vortez

Kingston HyperX 3K 240 GB @ techPowerUp
Kingston's HyperX 3K SSD is positioned at a more affordable price level than its blue non-3K sibling. Our performance testing reveals surprising numbers and the drive actually ends up faster than the regular HyperX.


Read more: Kingston HyperX 3K 240 GB @ techPowerUp

Antec ISK 110 VESA Case Review @ KitGuru
Today we are going to look at the Antec ISK 110 VESA which is a small form factor PC case that can be attached to the back of your monitor to save space. It's designed to be as compact as possible, only supporting the smallest components. This makes it ideal for those looking to build an office system or perhaps a basic home desktop.


Read more: Antec ISK 110 VESA Case Review @ KitGuru

Seasonic Platinum Series Fanless 460 W @ techPowerUp
Seasonic upgraded their smaller fanless units with the new KM3 platform. Not only does it offer better performance than the KM2 platform, but it also offers the highly sought after Platinum efficiency certification. Today, we will take a look at the fresh fanless unit with 460 W capacity and Platinum efficiency.


Read more: Seasonic Platinum Series Fanless 460 W @ techPowerUp

TP-LINK TL-WDR3500 Wireless N600 Router Review @ Legit Reviews
Throughout out testing the TP-Link TL-WDR3500 was rock solid with no drops of signal during our use. Once the router was set up, operation was seamless. Many people will appreciate the fact that you can set the router up out of the box with some level of security to your wireless devices in less than 10 minutes using the included Setup Wizard software. For more advanced users, you have the freedom to customize a number of options to personalize the router to your specific needs. We used the TP-Link in an office where there were multiple wired devices laptops, cell phones, tablets, and a Western Digital media player were all connected and working successfully using the TL-WDR3500...


Read more: TP-LINK TL-WDR3500 Wireless N600 Router Review @ Legit Reviews

Swiftech H220 Water Cooling System Review @ ThinkComputers.org
Long Beach, California based company Swiftech is known industry wide as one of the forefathers of liquid cooling. In 1999 they began developing peltier based cpu coolers for advanced overclocking which led Swiftech to begin working with liquid cooling solutions. Known today for their excellent quality water pumps, radiators, and liquid cooling blocks, Swiftech is easily one of the market leaders in the mainstream liquid cooling market. Until recently however, they have stayed out of the all in one (AIO) cooling solution game. Now, after 3 years of development, they have announced the H220. Aimed at the average user interested in liquid cooling but not yet ready to jump into a full blown custom loop, the H220 claims to be an affordable, adaptable, and silent cooling solution for all users. Follow along as we take the H220 through the gauntlet to see if it really is all it claims to be.


Read more: Swiftech H220 Water Cooling System Review @ ThinkComputers.org

Thermaltake Armor Revo GENE Snow Edition Review @ Vortez
Thermaltake are no stranger to the computer chassis market. Having numerous series under their belt, their portfolio is now rather vast and it continues to grow. Already this year we have seen A number of additions but today we shall be taking a look at a case which was released at the tail end of last year.

In the spotlight today is the Armor Revo GENE Snow Edition. This is the GENE version of the Revo case and “Snow” denotes the white variant. This mid-tower boasts an interesting array of features along with three pre-installed cooling fans which promise to aid low-temperatures and low-noise.


Read more: Thermaltake Armor Revo GENE Snow Edition Review @ Vortez

Rosewill Ultra-Slim "RedMere" HDMI Cables Review @ Hi Tech Legion
Rosewill’s latest Ultra-Slim HDMI cables utilize RedMere’s RM1695 mini-booster modules. These Ultra-Slim HDMI cables from Rosewill have easily manageable 36 AWG wires that come in either black or white color. Twelve SKUs in total are offered by Rosewill including lengths of 3, 6, 10 and 15 ft as well as Male A-to-Male D and Male-A to Male-C HDMI cable versions. Rosewill’s Ultra-slim cables have a gold-plated Male-A connector with a much smaller jacket measuring only 15mm wide, 5mm thick and 14mm long (20mm for the TV end which contains the Redmere module). This is considerably smaller compared to the standard HDMI jacket which is 18mm wide, 10mm thick and 24mm long. The Rosewill Ultra-Slim cables can also be used on IP-enabled devices without the use of a separate Ethernet cable.


Read more: Rosewill Ultra-Slim "RedMere" HDMI Cables Review @ Hi Tech Legion

Leave Six Strikes Alone! @ Techgage
Well, the day has finally come and gone – America’s “Six Strikes” rule came into effect last Monday, and two of the biggest ISPs in the US had adopted it by Wednesday (Verizon and Comcast), with Time Warner joining in by week’s end. Amidst all of the wailing and gnashing of teeth, the Internet… ticked right along as usual. Rather than just spraying out mindless vitriol like most of the technology world, I figured that I’d do the Techgage thing and actually take some time, read some of the laws and regulations, and come up with a bit more of a thorough (and less of a knee-jerk) opinion to share with you.

Of course, it seems like I might have been alone in that. Coverage has spanned the gamut from “this is awful” to “I want to murder the creators,” and the outcry from the technorati has been the usual fevered pitch above that. After some digging through not only the rules but also the media coverage of those rules, I have decided to don my best flame-retardant gear and send my opinion out into the inferno.


Read more: Leave Six Strikes Alone! @ Techgage

Fractal Design’s Adjust 108 Fan Controller Review @ Futurelooks
There are a number of good reasons to build your own personal computer. The one reason left out of this discussion more than anything is the “control” aspect. Everyone wants to have as much control over how their electronics work as much as possible. Fan controller software is cool, no pun intended, but there is nothing like a physical interface. The Fractal Design Adjust 108 fan controller gives me control over the fans in my PC individually. Let’s see how well it does at this task!


Read more: Fractal Design’s Adjust 108 Fan Controller Review @ Futurelooks

Corsair Hydro H90 & H110 CPU Coolers Review @ Hardware Canucks
With the closed loop liquid cooling market heating up with new competitors, Corsair has found their Hydro series beset from nearly every angle. Many of these coolers attach themselves to either the standard 120mm or 2x 120mm form factors in order to maximize compatibility and call it a day. However there are a few which buck this trend and Corsair’s H90 and H110 are two of the latest to do exactly that.

Very recently we had the opportunity to review both the NZXT Kraken X40 and X60 All In One units and walked away very impressed with both. They paired a high efficiency waterblock to large 140mm or 2x 140mm form factor radiators, included good fans and then sealed the deal with decent fan profile tweaking software. Essentially, the H90 and H110 are Corsair’s answer to these new competitors.


Read more: Corsair Hydro H90 & H110 CPU Coolers Review @ Hardware Canucks

Rosewill Armor EVO E-ATX Computer Case @ Benchmark Reviews
Rosewill has a wide range of computer accessories. Anything from tools, fans, cases, external enclosures, keyboards, and printer toner. Primarily Newegg's in-house brand, they've been expanding their product lines and reach; some of their products have recently started to show up at other retailers. I've found many of their products to provide an incredible performance per dollar ratio in the past, as one of my favorite computer chassis of all time is the Rosewill Thor v2. A beast of an enclosure, my only complaint was the Thor was a bit on the large side. When I saw the ARMOR-EVO E-ATX case announced, I wondered if my wish had come true - could the Armor-EVO provide the advantages of the Thor v2 in a smaller package? At Benchmark Reviews, we have a chance to find out.

Lose the fins, the extra "garnishes," and a couple inches off the top - and it would appear at first glance the Armor-EVO is a good follow-up to the Thor v2. Will the same approach to air cooling, with provisions for radiators if necessary, show the same result as a bigger chassis?

While I unfortunately do not currently have access to a 240mm radiator to test the water cooling claims, I DO have access to a Thor v2. I proceeded to build an overclocked, crossfired system into this chassis to compare its cooling performance directly with the bigger Thor. First, let's take a look inside to see what we're dealing with.


Read more: Rosewill Armor EVO E-ATX Computer Case @ Benchmark Reviews

ROCCAT Kone XTD & Kone Pure Gaming Mice Review @ Neoseeker
If you've been in the market for mice over the past few years, you may have heard of a company named ROCCAT. Based in Germany, ROCCAT largely focuses on computer peripherals for enthusiasts and gamers, producing products that look as stylish as they are functional. Slick blacks and blues are the highlight of the company branding – a style reminiscent of Razer's black and green theme.

Today, we will be looking at two of ROCCAT's newest gaming mice, the Kone XTD and Kone Pure. The Kone XTD is the larger of the two and boasts "Maximum Customization" by featuring 4 independently-lit LEDs, 8 fully programmable buttons, and an adjustable weight system. Not to be outdone, the Kone Pure features its own 16.8 million-color customizable lighting system and 7 programmable buttons. Both mice are wrapped in a soft-touch finish and come with an internal 72MHz Turbo Core V2 processor, an 8200DPI Pro-Aim R3 laser sensor, and ROCCAT's trademarked Easy-Shift[+] button; basically a Function key that gives each mouse button a secondary function.

ROCCAT's Kone XTD and Kone Pure look to be designed with enough technology to keep the savviest of computer and gaming enthusiasts pleased. Let's see how well they are truly implemented in our review!


Read more: ROCCAT Kone XTD & Kone Pure Gaming Mice Review @ Neoseeker

SteelSeries APEX [RAW] Gaming Keyboard Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Recently SteelSeries announced the APEX range of keyboards and the RAW Edition landed on our desk recently. With numerous extra buttons, backlighting and low profile keys it looks to find a balance between functionality and cost which will appeal to gamers on a budget.


Read more: SteelSeries APEX [RAW] Gaming Keyboard Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

AMD vs Nvidia: Radeon 7870 vs GeForce 660 Using Frame Times @ HCW
Choosing the right video card would be easy if budget wasn’t a consideration. Want the fastest single GPU video card today? Get a GeForce Titan for $1000. Don’t mind dual GPU or SLI? Drop $900 on a pair of Radeon 7970′s.

But if you do have a budget, it’s not quite that easy. There are dozens of cards to choose from in every price range, and depending on your budget, the best card can change dramatically.

What this article intends to do is figure out what is the best video card you can buy in 2013 with a budget of under $250, but over $200. For most hardware categories, this is the sweet spot.


Read more: AMD vs Nvidia: Radeon 7870 vs GeForce 660 Using Frame Times @ HCW

Intel Dishes On What Makes H.265 Worth Waiting For @ Techgage
Following-up on January’s H.265 announcement, we had a chat with Intel to better understand some of the developments and enhancements made to the upcoming codec, compared to the venerable H.264 (AVC). Although Intel isn’t the one conducting the development of H.265 (HEVC), the company has been keeping in good contact with those who are, because with the nature of its business, it pretty-well has to. We might not see on-CPU logic for H.265 anytime soon, but for Intel, the sooner things are sorted out, the better.

One of the most impressive aspects of H.265 so far has been its ability to look great at lower bit-rates, and much of that compression improvement comes from the larger block size used for image analysis; H.264 uses blocks of 16×16, while H.265 uses 64×64. Spacial transforms (the removal of information we can’t see or have difficulty seeing) are improved on the upcoming codec as well, using 32×32 transforms instead of H.264′s 8×8. Also, the more memory you have available, the faster you can encode (due to all of the extra inter-prediction modes used for motion detection).


Read more: Intel Dishes On What Makes H.265 Worth Waiting For @ Techgage

MOS Magnetic Organization System Review @ TestFreaks
Today we have a quick review of a novel product. Kickstarter has helped bring many new and exciting products to fruition and today we will look at one of these ideas come to retail – The MOS, Magnetic Organization System. This device is one of those ideas that will make you say – “why didn’t I think of that?”

This system is a novel way of keeping ones cables organized and easily accessible. If you never again want to fish a cable from behind your workspace, then the MOS, Magnetic Organization System might be what the doctor ordered.



Read more: MOS Magnetic Organization System Review @ TestFreaks

Fractal Design R4 Black Pearl Review @ Guru3D
To date there has been one chassis that somehow slipped through the mazes of all review materials here at the Guru3D LAB.

So yes, Fractal Design has had the R4 on the market for a while now and we still had to test the Black Pearl edition, aimed at the folks that go for style and silence with this all black mid-tower chassis. This ATX, Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX ready tower chassis can house a quite a bit of storage, has a decent amount of space to work in and is stylish in all its ways. The Define R4 features a front interface with USB 3.0 connectors and though a simple one, an integrated three-speed fan controller behind the front panel door.

Storage wise you may house a pair of external 5.25-inch drive bays, for ODDs (Optical Disk Drives) or anything else that uses that form factor of course. Then on the inside, Define R4 made sure you can house... get this, eight internal 3.5-inch HDDs as the bays allow eight of them to be installed with the a top bay being removable and the tray mounts all compatible with 2.5" SSDs.


Read more: Fractal Design R4 Black Pearl Review @ Guru3D

Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Review @ Techspot
Nvidia's Kepler architecture debuted a year ago with the GeForce GTX 680, which has sat somewhat comfortably as the market's top single-GPU graphics card, forcing AMD to reduce prices and launch a special HD 7970 GHz Edition card to help close the value gap. Despite besting its rival, many believe Nvidia had planned to make its 600 series flagship even faster by using the GK110 chip, but purposefully held back with the GK104 to save cash, since it was competitive enough performance-wise.

That isn't to say people were necessarily disappointed in the GTX 680. The 28nm part packs 3540 million transistors into a smallish 294mm2 die and delivers 18.74 Gigaflops per watt with a memory bandwidth of 192.2GB/s, while it tripled the GTX 580's CUDA cores and doubled its TAUs -- no small feat, to be sure. Nonetheless, we all knew the GK110 existed and we were eager to see how Nvidia brought it to the consumer market -- assuming it even decided to. Fortunately, that wait is now over.


Read more: Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Review @ Techspot

BeQuiet! Dark Power Pro 10 750W @ PureOverclock
BeQuiet! has an established reputation in the power supply market for those living in Europe, but the company isn’t as well known in North America. Looking to make a splash on this side of the pond with the Dark Power Pro 10 750W, the company is packing a litany of innovative features into a wonderfully sleek package for this unit.

It’s a competitive market though, as there are several established companies looking to attract consumers with various premium offerings. We’ve looked at quite a few power supplies in this range, and we’re anxious to see what BeQuiet brings to the table, as the first unit from them we’ve got on the test bench.


Read more: BeQuiet! Dark Power Pro 10 750W @ PureOverclock

ASUS Vulcan Pro Gaming Headset Review @ Hi Tech Legion
There are, however, factors that remain consistent between individuals that speaker engineers design toward. If you are designing an audiophile speaker, you naturally want a dead flat frequency response with a good balance between warmth and clarity. A speaker designed for larger areas like clubs and concerts will have more exaggerated highs and lows, with far more attention to clarity and warmth never entering the equation. Gaming has an entire set of addressable areas all its own. For the most part, you are essentially trying to reproduce sounds that are not real to begin with. Add to that the fact that location and clarity are high on the list, while exaggerated transient response and dynamic range are used to liven the sound to add psychoacoustic excitement to the game…you know, to get your blood pumping. You also need to make the environmentals and soundstage of the game world suck you in, so that you are immersed in this fictitious world, and outside distractions need to be blocked out. While audiophile fidelity may not be the end goal, designing a gaming headset is a very daunting task with far more twists and turns.


Read more: ASUS Vulcan Pro Gaming Headset Review @ Hi Tech Legion

Kingston Wi-Drive MobileLite+ Wireless Card Reader (Beta) @ MEGATech
Last year, we reviewed the Kingston Wi-Drive. This was a wireless storage solution for Android and iOS devices, allowing you to connect via Wi-Fi and share gigabytes of data. It’s a great idea, particularly for mobile devices that lack expandable memory card slots.

At CES earlier this year, Kingston revealed that they are working on expanding the Wi-Drive series of products to include a wireless card reader and that’s what we’re looking at today. It’s tentatively called the Kingston Wi-Drive MobileLite+, but I say tentatively because this is very much a beta product. They’ve turned to the community for feedback to see if there is demand for such a product and, if so, how they can go about improving it before an official retail launch.


Read more: Kingston Wi-Drive MobileLite+ Wireless Card Reader (Beta) @ MEGATech

Mad Catz F.R.E.Q.7 Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review @ Nikktech
As most of you know now (if not all) while typing these lines CeBIT the largest electronics & PC hardware related exhibition in the EU is taking place in Hanover, Germany with countless products showcased by pretty much every manufacturer on the face of the planet. Unfortunately however that left us with two choices, either go there ourselves to cover everything happening at CeBIT up close and personal (not really that far compared to CES so it would be a lot easier to do so) or remain here, post news from CeBIT and at the same time continue our testing to keep our schedule. Well the decision was quite an obvious one (although i haven't been in CeBIT for a long time) and so for the past 6 days we've been spending quite a bit of time with the latest peripheral by Mad Catz, the F.R.E.Q.7 7.1 Virtual Surround PC Gaming Headset.


Read more: Mad Catz F.R.E.Q.7 Surround Sound Gaming Headset Review @ Nikktech

AZiO Levatron GH808 USB Gaming Headset Review @ OCC
Will this headset make you grin when you get shot at in Call of Duty, Battlefield 3, or Bioshock: Infinite? Absolutely, unequivocally, and without a doubt. At the same time they will probably make many cringe slightly when listening to well-known music or movies with deep bass tracks. For gaming, however, they do provide an exceptional level of interaction that is hard to match with many other similarly-priced headsets.


Read more: AZiO Levatron GH808 USB Gaming Headset Review @ OCC

iBuypower Revolt SFF Gaming System Review @ HotHardware.com
Custom PC makers are getting increasingly creative, particularly with small form factor gaming systems. There was a time when the lion's share of the sexiest gaming rigs consisted of high-end components mounted in large, gaudy (but fun) chassis with lots of lights, killer paint jobs, and perhaps a wild mass of liquid cooling tubes and hardware.

Although those systems are still around, and we still love to play with them, the boutique builders are using their design and engineering skills to build smaller systems that still pack a mean punch on the performance side. We’re starting to see beautiful custom chassis with cool asymmetric angles and components packed in with the utmost care and creativity.

iBuypower’s Revolt is a perfect example of this trend. We first got an up-close look at this thing at CES this January, and now we’ve had the chance to pore over it in detail.


Read more: iBuypower Revolt SFF Gaming System Review @ HotHardware.com

MSI GX60 1AC-021US Review @ TechReviewSource.com
The MSI GX60 1AC is a mid-sized, affordable gaming laptop that has a 1080p display, a Blu-ray optical drive, above average battery life and solid performance. It does lack a backlit keyboard and the touch pad is rather small for our liking.

The design of the MSI GX60 isn't too much to talk about but it definitely looks like a gaming laptop. The lid is made of glossy black plastic that does show a lot of fingerprints. The top also features a chrome-MSI logo to further add to the aesthetic. The inside keyboard deck has a brushed-aluminum wrist area that provides some durability. The laptop weighs 7.7-pounds, so it's definitely not meant to be carried around too frequently.

The keyboard is designed by SteelSeries and provides a very comfortable typing experience. The keys are flat and have a tactile feel to them. There wasn't much noticeable flexing and the keys had good feedback when clicked. The Windows key is located to the right of the Space bar to keep gamers from accidentally pressing it while gaming, but for normal use, it takes some getting used to. The keyboard also is not backlit, which was really disappointing.


Read more: MSI GX60 1AC-021US Review @ TechReviewSource.com

TT eSports x Softball Review @ XS Reviews
Today we’ll be looking at the TT ESPORTS Theron – the company’s high to mid-range gaming mouse, designed with input from Taiwanese StarCraft II pro-gamer Softball. Softball hasn’t impressed in international competition thus far, but we’ll see if his mouse is more worthy of praise.

Specifications

100 – 5600 DPI Adjustable: Fully Functional on Most Surfaces.
40 Fully Customizable Macro Keys for RTS/FPS Game Genres.
Superb Customizable Graphical UI for Macro Keys, Advanced Performance, and Lighting-Effect Options.
7 Colors of Pause-Break Lighting Effect on the Dragon logo
Polling rate switch button (125/500/1000 Hz cycle), and Function-Lock Button provided to disable side button functions.
123.65 X 73.8 X 40.2 (mm)
On-Board 128kb Memory Storage for 40 Macro Keys within 5 Game Profiles.n-Board 128kb Memory Storage for 40 Macro Keys within 5 Game Profiles.
Weight-In Design for Perfect Handling Mouse Movement x 4.5g, up to 22.5g max


Read more: TT eSports x Softball Review @ XS Reviews

CeBIT 2013 Event Gallery and Video Interviews @ HardwareHeaven.com
This week HardwareHeaven headed over to Germany to attend the annual CeBIT trade event, here we have some interviews conducted by Kaeyi for HardwareHeaven and a gallery of the event. Enjoy!


Read more: CeBIT 2013 Event Gallery and Video Interviews @ HardwareHeaven.com

Revolution or Evolution? ASUS GTX 670 DirectCU Mini On Show @ Anandtech
A noticeable trend in the current desktop ecosystem is towards the small, as evidenced by the Intel NUC and successes of mini-ITX products like the BitFenix Prodigy. Users, gamers and enthusiasts all want something powerful in a physically small envelope, and while we have cases and motherboards that match this sort of size, the GPU ecosystem has been slow to accommodate. Sure, larger mITX cases like the Prodigy exist, and users can select between a beefy GPU or hard drive bays, but what if you want both? Insert the ASUS GTX 670 DirectCU Mini, debuted on the ROG Forums.


Read more: Revolution or Evolution? ASUS GTX 670 DirectCU Mini On Show @ Anandtech




Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/5_gadgets_to_look_out_for_in_2013_and_more.html)