2012 NVIDIA Video Card Driver Performance Review and more
Posted on: 01/22/2013 12:26 PM

Here the daily reviews roundup with 18 new articles, including 2012 NVIDIA Video Card Driver Performance Review, Dell Latitude 6430u Review, ADATA Premier Pro 32GB SDHC UHS-1 Memory Card Review, HIS HD 7970 IceQ X² & HD 7950 IceQ X² Review, and Intel Core i7-3960x vs. i7-3970x: A Clash of Titans

2012 NVIDIA Video Card Driver Performance Review @ HardOCP
We are taking the time to look back at NVIDIA's driver performance and support for 2012. Last year NVIDIA introduced to the world the GeForce GTX 600 series video cards. We will be using a GeForce GTX 680 and a GTX 670 to compare 2012's WHQL driver performance over time to see if and how much performance has improved.


Read more: 2012 NVIDIA Video Card Driver Performance Review @ HardOCP

Dell Latitude 6430u Review @ TechReviewSource.com
The Dell Latitude 6430u is a business-centered Ultrabook that offers long battery life for a long day's work, solid performance and an attractive, professional design. It also comes loaded with all the ports you'll need and very fast boot times to keep you from waiting. One thing we would have liked to see improved was the relatively dim display.


Read more: Dell Latitude 6430u Review @ TechReviewSource.com

Lenovo ThinkPad Twist Review @ Techradar
Laptops are for serious work and tablets are for consuming media. That's the general consensus when it comes to modern computing. A consensus that's easily disproved, but one which, as a general rule of thumb, sums up our attitudes to these two separate ways of using the latest technology. At least, that was the general idea before Windows 8 came along, which meant that Lenovo could release a machine just like the ThinkPad Twist.The Lenovo ThinkPad Twist squeezes a lot out of its sturdy design. As the name suggests, unlike laptops that are restrained by a single clamshell action, the screen on the Twist can be easily rotated so that it ends up facing away from the keyboard.


Read more: Lenovo ThinkPad Twist Review @ Techradar

Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme CPU Cooler Review @ ThinkComputers.org
Here is a word that we are almost inundated with these days. It seems that everyone is so desperate to prove themselves unique they grasp at, and identify with, terms such as this. In the end, it just makes all such products blend together into a group identified with overly emphasized phrases and words. And so it is with utter disdain for this products name that we present to you a 240mm closed loop liquid cooler brought to us by Thermaltake (Tt), the Water 2.0 Extreme. Read on to see if this “Extreme” truly is “of a character or kind farthest removed from the ordinary or average” or just an average cooling product to be avoided.


Read more: Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme CPU Cooler Review @ ThinkComputers.org

Antec GX700 Case Review @ HardwareHeaven.com
Now, proving once again that they dont just do black boxes Antec are releasing the GX700. With a price tag of $60 and military styling can Antec prove that cheap and cheerful can also be stylish and functional?


Read more: Antec GX700 Case Review @ HardwareHeaven.com

AVEXIR MPower Core Series 16GB 1600MHz DDR3 Review @ Vortez
Memory is a key component of any computer system. Without it the PC simply will not work. In years gone by memory was simply exposed chips on a green PCB but the advent of overclocking and faster, more powerful memory kits, heatspreaders soon became the norm with manufacturers adding bigger and bolder designs with every release. Many may claim that a heatspreader on a memory kit is simply not necessary however, it is also said that the colder a module runs, the more likely it is to stand the rigours of time and as with all things 'overclocked', the colder it is, the better it overclocks. Whichever side of the fence you sit on, you are forced to agree that a module with a heatspreader attached offers more protection and certainly looks better than a bare module.


Read more: AVEXIR MPower Core Series 16GB 1600MHz DDR3 Review @ Vortez

Zalman LQ315 CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets
The Zalman LQ315 is a mainstream liquid cooling system for processors. It has a 120 mm radiator with one 120 mm fan. Let's test it.


Read more: Zalman LQ315 CPU Cooler Review @ Hardware Secrets

ADATA Premier Pro 32GB SDHC UHS-1 Memory Card Review @ Legit Reviews
If you are looking for are looking for a fast SDHC memory card then the ADATA Premier Pro series should be of interest to you. We found the rated write speeds were spot on and that is important to photography professionals, especially those that do continuous burst mode shooting or do high dynamic range (HDR) imaging! We used this card on a number of cameras and found no pause or hesitation when taking high resolution pictures as the camera wasn't waiting on the memory card to finish writing...


Read more: ADATA Premier Pro 32GB SDHC UHS-1 Memory Card Review @ Legit Reviews

Cooler Master Seidon 240M AIO Liquid CPU Cooler Review @ Hi Tech Legion
There is a somewhat similar situation in the AiO liquid cooling market. At the onset of its popularity, it was dominated solely by some of the top names in computer components, but companies that had limited commercial products pertaining to CPU cooling prior. The fold was soon joined by companies that were obviously more cooling oriented, but we didn’t see any great shakeups in the market or in performance. NZXT recently joined the fold with the larger 140mm based X40 and X60 models that saw a huge jump in performance capabilities to go along with the larger radiators. It seemed unusual that liquid cooling leader Swiftech and innovative Cooler Master (who has dabbled in liquid cooling in the past) stayed out of the AIO market. However, that is changing and the old pros are entering the field.

Cooler Master’s Seidon 240M boasts an all in-house design and development set to show off all of Cooler Master’s expertise. The Seidon 240M comes equipped with a 240mm radiator, copper contact block and a unique Cooler Master designed pump. The Seidon 240M uses Ultra-Fine Micro Channel technology in their contact plate, which actually increases the amount of water coming into contact with the copper. Simple reason tells you that increased water contact results in greater potential heat dissipation. The Seidon 240M uses kink-free hard plastic corrugated tubing for the liquid path, shown to have better aging and evaporation characteristics than rubber hoses. Two 60-2400rpm 120mm fans capable of over 86 CFM handle the air movement chores for the Seidon 240M, with the wide rpm range offering near silence or extreme performance. The fin design of the 240mm radiator has been tuned to maximize airflow. This results in more efficient cooling, and also considerably cuts down on associated noise.


Read more: Cooler Master Seidon 240M AIO Liquid CPU Cooler Review @ Hi Tech Legion

HIS HD 7970 IceQ X² & HD 7950 IceQ X² Review @ Hardware Canucks
As today’s GPU architectures age gracefully, board partners have gone through the process of releasing many overclocked, custom cooled cards with upgraded components which enhance their appeal for overclockers and gamers alike. Amongst all of these new and improved versions of current graphics technology, a few stood out to us. Among them was HIS’s new IceQ X² series which updates the original IceQ heatsink design with additional thermal capacity and a completely revised fan design.

For this review, we will be looking at HIS’s HD 7970 GHz Edition IceQ X² and HD 7950 Boost Clock IceQ X². They remain at AMD’s reference clock speeds and instead rely upon offering excellent overclocking headroom and some advanced cooling features to justify a slight premium. Now, HIS does sell an overclocked version of the HD 7970 GHz Edition which uses the “Turbo” moniker but we decided to focus upon two more affordable alternatives.

The price for these cards isn’t all that bad with the HD 7970 GHz version going for about $460 while the HD 7950 Boost Clock hits the $320 mark. Considered the reference editions retail for $440 and $300 respectively, it’s good to see HIS offering significant technological improvements for a $20 premium. However, since AMD’s major game promo ended last month some luster has been taken off the higher end Radeon GPUs as they no longer have a value added bundle.


Read more: HIS HD 7970 IceQ X² & HD 7950 IceQ X² Review @ Hardware Canucks

Spire X2.9883 CPU Cooler Review @ NikKTech
Although the winter season is not the most ideal time for people to go out to get a brand new CPU Cooler either to replace the stock and somewhat weak (and loud) Intel/AMD HSF or upgrade to something better from an aftermarket solution due to low temperatures still new products are released almost on a daily basis and it's our job to test them. Now as most of you know tower (U-type) CPU Coolers have been around for over half a decade but aside minor design and size differences the main concept/base is always the same. However this is quite understandable since their cooling performance levels are already very good and in some cases they are even maxed out which is why many of the leading manufacturers in the market are turning towards compact liquid CPU Coolers. Not everyone however can afford a liquid CPU Cooler and there are always those who can but don't want to spend much so because of that today we decided to test the latest U-type tower design CPU Cooler by Spire, the X2.9883.


Read more: Spire X2.9883 CPU Cooler Review @ NikKTech

OCZ Vector 256GB SSD Review @ Neoseeker
OCZ's latest SSD offering is the 256GB Vector which we're reviewing here today. OCZ is taking solid state drives to the next level with the Vector lineup, featuring the new Indilinx infused Barefoot 3 controller that promises to bring extreme performance to the masses at an attractive price (around $0.93 per gigabyte). The Vector series will be available in several storage capacities: 128GB, 256GB and 512GB versions.

Taking a quick look at the package, on the front is a brief description of OCZ's Vector SSD that highlights the SATA III (6Gbps), MLC Flash Memory and Indilinx technologies, as well as TRIM support, the included 3.5/inch desktop adapter and bonus Acronis True Image software (download required). At the back of the box is a brief description in multiple languages.


Read more: OCZ Vector 256GB SSD Review @ Neoseeker

Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme 240mm Liquid Cooling System Review @ Futurelooks
Today ‘s most elite PC systems feature elaborate custom cooling systems to manage CPU, GPU and occasionally even chipset temperatures. While the process has come a long way in the last 10 years, it still takes a bit of home work to choose the right parts and patience in assembling them a system properly. Fortunately, all in one liquid cooling systems have also come a long way and can can save a lot of time and money as well.

Not too long ago, I installed a Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme LCS in a GIGABYTE demo system for Intel Lanfest Infernalan. The goal was simple: cool the CPU as quietly as possible without sacrificing overclocking or gaming performance. Even though past experience has taught me that a custom liquid cooling system works better, I’ve discovered that even the science in these all in one loops have progressed too. If you’re considering liquid cooling but don’t won’t to deal with custom liquid cooling, then our review of the Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme might offer you another option.


Read more: Thermaltake Water 2.0 Extreme 240mm Liquid Cooling System Review @ Futurelooks

NZXT Phantom 630 @ techPowerUp
NZXT has taken the 820 and shrunk it, removing some non-vital features in the process: the case clocks in at 50 US Dollars less while still being quite massive, with the same futuristic look and extremely well-engineered interior. We take the 200 US Dollar case for a spin to see if we end up eyeing its bigger brother at all.


Read more: NZXT Phantom 630 @ techPowerUp

Intel Core i7-3960x vs. i7-3970x: A Clash of Titans @ Bjorn3D
With the Intel Core i7-3970X taking the crown for the fastest six-core processor for the desktop market, how can this 150W TDP monster compare to its younger brother, the i7-3960X? Can the $10 difference in price justify its performance and stability? In this review the Core i7-3960X and the Core i7-3970X go head-to-head in some real-world application benchmarks.


Read more: Intel Core i7-3960x vs. i7-3970x: A Clash of Titans @ Bjorn3D

DmC: Devil May Cry Review (PS3) @ KitGuru
The recent reboot to Capcom's Devil May Cry franchise developed by Ninja Theory has been an ongoing topic of controversy ever since it was announced. Some fans of the originals have been crying foul at the redesign of Dante and anything else that didn't mimic the older titles. Gameplay footage and the demo release swayed some, but others remained certain that the game was an abomination doomed to fail. Who is right?


Read more: DmC: Devil May Cry Review (PS3) @ KitGuru

KingFast F3 Series mSATA3.0 SSD KF1310MCF 120GB Review @ Madshrimps
The F3 mSATA 3.0 SSDs from KingFast come in multiple storage variants and are especially made for fitting inside low profile HTPCs, high-end ultrabooks or light notebooks. Thanks to the included mSATA to SATA adapter which is included inside the packaging, we can also use the product inside any desktop PC.


Read more: KingFast F3 Series mSATA3.0 SSD KF1310MCF 120GB Review @ Madshrimps

Philips Brilliance AMVA LCD Review @ Techradar
What sets the new Philips Brilliance AMVA monitor apart is its feature set. As well as HDMI and DVI, there is a VGA port as well as a full-size DisplayPort. Then there's a built-in webcam that connects to your Mac via USB, and you also get three USB 2.0 ports. Then there's the 90-degree pivot as well as PowerSensor technology, so when you're no longer in front of your display, it dims to reduce power consumption. Such inspired thinking doesn't extend to the casing, which looks too office-like for us. We also hated the ancient-looking on-screen menu. Brightness is superb, though there is a slight graininess to the display.


Read more: Philips Brilliance AMVA LCD Review @ Techradar


Printed from Linux Compatible (http://www.linuxcompatible.org/news/story/2012_nvidia_video_card_driver_performance_review_and_more.html)