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Guides: Linux Firewall: Overcoming Email Server Problems
2010-04-29 09:00:58 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

OCModShop posted another Linux Firewall guide: Overcoming Email Server Problems

"As discussed in our article "Why Build a Linux Firewall", there are many advantages to having a custom-built firewall appliance in your home. While these Linux distributions are easy to set up and have nice User Interfaces, they still have some problems. Not every feature of Linux is exposed in the GUI, so while these firewalls are very capable they don't allow for simple customization.

In this article we show you your options on making your network more secure, and how to preserve your online reputation with a little customization of your Linux firewall. While we use IPcop, many of these tips work on just about any firewall that uses IPtables."

>> Linux Firewall: Overcoming Email Server Problems

Guides: The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 8 (Helena)
2009-12-01 23:54:44 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about setting up Linux Mint 8 as desktop replacement for a Windows desktop

"This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 8 (Helena) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 8 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 9.10 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies."

>> The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 8 (Helena)

Guides: Using the ASUS Xonar Essence STX Under Linux
2009-10-21 10:48:42 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Techgage.com posted a guide on using the ASUS Xonar Essence STX under Linux

"Crave high-end audio, but use Linux? The situation surrounding this has been bad in the past, but that's not so much the case now, especially where ASUS' Xonar family of cards are concerned, including the headphone-specific Essence STX. Thanks to dedicated developers, the support today is just about as good as the audio quality."

>> Using the ASUS Xonar Essence STX Under Linux

Guides: Virtualization With XenServer 5.5.0
2009-06-28 13:22:07 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about virtualization with XenServer 5.5.0

"This Howto covers the installation of XenServer 5.5.0 and the creation of virtual machines with the XenCenter administrator console. XenServer is a free virtualization platform from Citrix, the company behind the well known Xen virtualization engine. XenServer makes it easy to create, run and manage Xen virtual machines with the XenCenter administrator console. The XenServer installation CD contains a full Linux distribution which is customized to run XenServer."

>> Virtualization With XenServer 5.5.0

Guides: Custom Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation
2009-04-28 10:38:24 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

OCModShop posted part 4 of their Linux Firewall series

"If you already have an Internet Router that you're intending to replace , I recommend some prep-work to make things easier. Most routers are set as the gateway to their network (i.e. 192.168.1.1), and this is probably the address that you want your firewall to use. Otherwise, you'll have to set the firewall to 192.168.1.2 or some other address, which can get real confusing really fast. Go ahead and log into your existing firewall, and change its address to 192.168.1.2, or some other number, so that it will not conflict with your new firewall. And turn off DHCP, since your new firewall should be the new DHCP server... you don't want two servers trying to dole out dynamic IP addresses and wreaking all sorts of havok."

>> Custom Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation

Guides: Xen: How to Convert An Image-Based Guest To An LVM-Based Guest
2009-04-19 16:37:58 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about convert an image-based guest to an LVM-based guest in Xen

"This short article explains how you can move/convert a Xen guest that uses disk images to LVM volumes. Virtual machines that use disk images are very slow and heavy on disk IO, therefore it is often better to use LVM. Also, LVM-based guests are easier to back up (using LVM snapshots)."

>> Xen: How to Convert An Image-Based Guest To An LVM-Based Guest

Guides: Linux Firewall Part 3: Selecting Your Hardware
2009-04-18 16:14:46 Source: Email [ Print | 1 Comment(s) ]

OCModShop posted part 3 of their Linux Firewall series

"As mentioned in the previous segment, you can create a professional-level firewall using old hardware that you would otherwise throw away. Some people may choose to purchase new dedicated hardware, which can have several advantages. Either way, you can create a hardware firewall costs significantly less than the $1000-$3000 that professional hardware devices can cost."

>> Linux Firewall Part 3: Selecting Your Hardware

Guides: Custom Firewall Part 2: Determine Your Network Setup
2009-04-09 15:59:17 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

OCModShop posted part 2 of their Linux firewall series

"Many firewalls make certain assumptions and use several standard conven tions. Understand the standard terminologies and you'll have an easier time when setting up your firewall.

Firewalls use standard conventions when referencing areas of the network. There are four basic network types, all of which can be managed by the firewall at the same time. These networks are called"

>> Custom Firewall Part 2: Determine Your Network Setup

Guides: Building a Custom Firewall Part 1: Why?
2009-04-07 10:44:04 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

OCModShop posted an article series about building a Linux-based firewall

"Kids today have more adult freedoms and priveledges than any prior generation. Add to that all of the unwarranted privacy they receive, and you'll see that any parent should be concerned about what their kids are doing online. It's in the news every week: some teenager who has committed suicide over Internet Bullying, kids being listed as sex offenders for broadcasting naked photos of themselves. And don't even get me started on how anonynimity emboldens angry teens to behave in aggressive, rude, and socially reprehensible ways... especially when many families today only have one parent in the house. Do you think kids would act this way if they knew someone was watching?"

>> Building a Custom Firewall Part 1: Why?

Guides: Hardening the Linux desktop
2008-11-25 19:15:10 Source: Jayne [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

DevelopersWorks published an article about hardening the Linux desktop

"Although GNU/Linux has the reputation of being a more secure operating system than Microsoft Windows, you still need to secure the Linux desktop. This tutorial takes you through the steps of installing and configuring antivirus software, creating a backup-restore plan, and making practical use of a firewall. When you finish, you'll have the tools you need to harden your Linux desktop against most attacks and prevent illegal access to your computer. "

>> Hardening the Linux desktop

Guides: Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump
2008-11-25 15:25:53 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge published a tutorial about clone/back up/restore OpenVZ VMs with vzdump

"vzdump is a backup and restore utility for OpenVZ VMs. This tutorial shows how you can use it to clone/back up/restore virtual machines with vzdump."

>> Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

Guides: The Perfect Desktop - gOS 3.0 Gadgets
2008-10-02 14:25:14 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about setting up gOS 3.0 Gadgets desktop as Windows desktop replacement

"This tutorial shows how you can set up a gOS 3.0 Gadgets desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. gOS is a lightweight Linux distribution, based on Ubuntu 8.04, that comes with Google Apps and some other Web 2.0 applications; gOS 3.0 Gadgets uses the GNOME desktop."

>> The Perfect Desktop - gOS 3.0 Gadgets

Guides: How to build and customize your own PBX with Asterisk
2008-08-15 12:45:51 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Geek.com demonstrates how easy it is to roll your own PBX in about an hour or two.

"Provided that the instructions are followed carefully, you too should be able to set up your very own switchboard/PBX system and all for the cost of the hardware of your choice. The beauty of Asterisk (Asterisk.org) is that it is free and offers all this functionality right out of the box. Asterisk is a software implementation of a hardware PBX and can run on a variety of hardware platforms."

>> How to build and customize your own PBX with Asterisk

Guides: How To Patch BIND9 Against DNS Cache Poisoning (Debian/Fedora/CentOS)
2008-07-29 11:49:54 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about patching BIND9 against DNS cache poisoning

"Dan Kaminsky earlier this month announced a massive, multi-vendor issue with DNS that could allow attackers to compromise any name server - clients, too. These two articles explain how you can fix a BIND9 nameserver on Debian Etch and Fedora/CentOS so that it is not vulnerable anymore to DNS cache poisoning."

>> Guide for Debian Etch
>> Guide for CentOS

Guides: Embedding Python In Apache2 With mod_python (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva)
2008-07-22 15:25:08 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge posted a guide about embedding Python In Apache2 with mod_python

"This tutorial shows how to install and use mod_python on various distributions (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva, OpenSUSE) with Apache2. mod_python is an Apache module that embeds the Python interpreter within the server. It allows you to write web-based applications in Python that will run many times faster than traditional CGI and will have access to advanced features such as ability to retain database connections and other data between hits and access to Apache internals."

>> Embedding Python In Apache2 With mod_python (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva)

Guides: Puppy Linux On USB Stick How-To
2008-07-13 09:02:15 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

PC Mech posted a Puppy Linux on USB stick guide

"Puppy Linux is a small (by design) Linux distribution that easily fits on a USB stick. If your computer has the ability to boot from a USB stick (which many do), this can benefit you in a number of ways."

>> Puppy Linux On USB Stick How-To

Guides: Run Linux in Windows
2008-06-30 01:19:31 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

PC Review have a new article on how to run Linux in Windows, by emulating a Virtual PC

"Many users of Windows XP and Vista will want to try Linux at some point, often just to see what all the fuss is about. There are many different Linux distributions and it isn't convenient for a non-technical user to set up dual booting alongside an existing Windows install. Thankfully, there are tools available which mean you can play with a full Linux install inside the familiar surroundings of Microsoft Windows."

>> Run Linux in Windows

Guides: The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 5 Elyssa R1
2008-06-26 09:54:39 Source: Falko Timme [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Howtoforge published a guide about setting up Linux Mint 5 Elyssa R1 as a replacement for a Windows desktop

"This tutorial shows how you can set up a Linux Mint 5 Elyssa R1 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Linux Mint 5 is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 8.04 that has lots of packages in its repositories (like multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, Google Earth, etc.) that are relatively hard to install on other distributions; it therefore provides a user-friendly desktop experience even for Linux newbies."

>> The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 5 Elyssa R1

Guides: Snort your way to more secure websites
2008-06-06 17:39:08 Source: Jayne [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Developer Works published an article on Snort, a free and open source Network Intrusion Prevention System and Network Intrusion Detection System tool

"Enter Snort, a free and open source Network Intrusion Prevention System and Network Intrusion Detection System tool for managing and preventing intrusions to your Web sites, applications, and Internet-enabled programs. "

>> Snort your way to more secure websites

Guides: Working with Wireless in Linux
2008-04-25 14:00:35 Source: Email [ Print | 0 Comment(s) ]

Bit-Tech published a guide to using Wireless Networking in Linux titled Working with Wireless in Linux

"However, many people will immediately say that Linux is simply not ready for the masses -- and I agree with them. What bugs me is that when asked why, I'm hearing complaints from ages past treated as present-day problems: "I don't want to have to work in a command line,"/ and /"It's so hard to configure," are just a couple of examples.

It's true that some things still aren't utterly plug-and-pray, but a lot of things really //are nowadays. Unfortunately, one thing has continued to stay on the fringes of penguin compatibility no matter how pervasive it's become in day-to-day life: Wireless networking.

Windows and OSX have such simple ways of dealing with wireless, but for many very good corporate reasons, open-source alternatives have not seen such love. The problem stems from drivers, which (for open source operating systems especially) divulge a //lot of secrets for how the hardware operates. Talk about giving away the golden egg -- how would you like to broadcast every little thing that makes you special to your competitors worldwide?!

Unfortunately, because of the very tight control wars over drivers in general, Linux has lagged in the wireless world. We've largely been forced to go hunt for revision numbers and version SKUs on packaging, scrolling through ten boxes of four brands of card to find which one features a chipset that bothered to develop proper Linux drivers (for the record, that's mostly Ralink and Atheros, which you can find in various card versions of several major brands including Linksys, Netgear and D-Link). Once our prize was found, we'd run home and fire it to gleefully enjoy...

...the same wireless that any Windows user had in about five minutes. Or, worse yet, maybe we got the revision number wrong or it wasn't clearly marked, and the chipset didn't work."

>> Working with Wireless in Linux

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